Table of Contents

Teaching The Wire: Crime, Evidence and Kids

Andrea Dennis, University of Georgia Law School

The Holmes School of Law: A Proposal to Reform Legal Education Through Realism

Robert Rubinson, University of Baltimore - School of Law

Some Realism About Realism in Teaching About the Legal Profession

Ann Southworth, University of California, Irvine School of Law
Bryant Garth, University of California-Irvine, Southwestern Law School, American Bar Foundation
Catherine Fisk, University of California, Irvine School of Law

Teaching the Digital Caveman: Rethinking the Use of Classroom Technology in Law School

James B. Levy, Nova Southeastern University - Shepard Broad Law Center

Investigating the Results: A Criminologists Licensure Exam Study

Adrian Tamayo, University of Mindanao - Research and Publication Center


LAW EDUCATOR: COURSES, MATERIALS & TEACHING eJOURNAL

"Teaching The Wire: Crime, Evidence and Kids" Free Download
64 J. LEGAL EDUC. 111 (2014).
UGA Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2015-16

ANDREA DENNIS, University of Georgia Law School
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I have a confession: I have only watched Season 1 of The Wire, and it has been many years since I did that. Thus, both my knowledge and pedagogical use of the show are limited. What explanation can I offer for my failings? I am a Maryland native with family who resides in Baltimore City, or Charm City as it is affectionately called. I worked for several years as an assistant federal public defender in Baltimore City. Over time, I have seen the city evolve, and I have seen it chew up and spit out many good people and some not so good people. So, in the past, I told students who asked whether I had ever seen The Wire: “Why should I watch a fictional version of what I (painfully) experienced as reality?� Although it took many years after the series ended, I did eventually break down and watch Season 1. In doing so, I discovered that the show is an ideal source for exploration of issues arising in three courses I teach. To date, I have used portions of Season 1 as platforms for assessing students’ comprehension of the materials in these courses.

"The Holmes School of Law: A Proposal to Reform Legal Education Through Realism" Free Download
Boston College Journal of Law & Social Justice, Vol. 35, No. 1, April 2015, pp. 33-57.

ROBERT RUBINSON, University of Baltimore - School of Law
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This article proposes the formation of a new law school, the Holmes School of Law. The curriculum of the Holmes School would draw upon legal realism, particularly as articulated by Oliver Wendell Holmes. The proposed curriculum would focus on educating students about “law in fact� — how law is actually experienced. It rejects the idea that legal education should be about reading cases written by judges who not only bring their own biases and cultural understandings to their role, but who also ignore law as experienced, which, in the end, is what law is. This disconnect is especially troubling because virtually all legal education ignores law as experienced by low-income people. The article concludes with responses to anticipated objections to the proposal.

"Some Realism About Realism in Teaching About the Legal Profession" Free Download
The New Legal Realism: Translating Law-and-Society for Today's Legal Practice, Vol. I: Putting Law in its Place: The New Legal Realist Project; Macaulay, Mertz & Mitchell, Eds., 2015, Forthcoming
UC Irvine School of Law Research Paper No. 2015-51

ANN SOUTHWORTH, University of California, Irvine School of Law
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BRYANT GARTH, University of California-Irvine, Southwestern Law School, American Bar Foundation
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CATHERINE FISK, University of California, Irvine School of Law
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UC Irvine Law School has adopted a first-year course designed to introduce students to the rich empirical literature on the legal profession and to give them an understanding of practice realities and critical perspectives on those practices. It also seeks to provide students with information about the social and cultural contexts of law practice that they will find useful as they navigate their careers. This chapter describes and assesses the course and our experience while teaching it.

"Teaching the Digital Caveman: Rethinking the Use of Classroom Technology in Law School" Free Download
19 Chapman Law Review __ (Fall 2015 Forthcoming)

JAMES B. LEVY, Nova Southeastern University - Shepard Broad Law Center
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The term “digital native� was created by an educational consultant more than a decade ago to suggest a sharp divide between students born into a digital world and “digital immigrants.� It has sent legal educators into a tizzy ever since trying to figure out how best to teach this supposedly new breed of law student. Do we allow laptops in the classroom or ban them? Is multitasking part of a new learning style or does it interfere with learning? Are today’s students primarily “visual learners� who learn best with technologies like PowerPoint or is traditional media like print more effective?

This article begins by putting the present debate over the learning styles of “digital natives� into historical context revealing that new technologies have always led to a “moral panic� that they are changing the way students think and learn. To avoid making the same mistakes again, this article suggests we reject popular stereotypes and clichés about digital natives and look instead to learning science for a more objective understanding about how our students really learn. Only by understanding how the brain works and what it was originally designed to do can we make well-informed decisions about when to use classroom technologies and when to shut them off. Based on the foregoing, the last section of this article offers guidelines for making better use of several popular classroom technologies in ways that promote the critical thinking skills at the heart of a legal education.

"Investigating the Results: A Criminologists Licensure Exam Study" Free Download

ADRIAN TAMAYO, University of Mindanao - Research and Publication Center
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The study revealed that the board examination for the criminologists showed marginal improvement though the year-end examinations lag behind compared to mid-year exams.

Looking at the causal relationship of the academic performance with board examination indicated no influence of the latter with the former. However, a further investigation revealed that students were faring impressively in the licensure examination. The discord between academic performance and the board outcome may be attributed to stringent assessment given by the program to its would-be takers.

It was also observed that of the 6 subjects in the board exam, one subject did not show statistical significance, while the strongest predictor of the board is criminal jurisprudence and procedure, law enforcement administration and the criminal sociology. The threshold score which may be observed by the college to determine readiness is a rating of 75 (or 70 using a 5% margin of error).

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About this eJournal

This eJournal is designed to offer a vehicle for law teachers to share information and materials about teaching. All materials related to law teaching are encouraged. This includes casebooks, reviews of casebooks, supplementary materials (for your own or someone else's book), lecture notes, class summaries, outlines, syllabi, problems and other teaching materials. It also includes scholarship about teaching. We hope that Law Educator will grow in future years to include a full range of teaching materials, including PowerPoint slides, Excel spreadsheets, video content and other material.

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Law Educator: Courses, Materials & Teaching eJournal

CRAIG H. ALLEN
Judson Falknor Professor of Law, University of Washington - School of Law, Interim Director, UW Arctic Law and Policy Institute

DOROTHY ANDREA BROWN
Professor of Law, Emory University School of Law

JOHN S. DZIENKOWSKI
University of Texas - School of Law, The Kay Bailey Hutchison Center for Energy, Law, and Business

HEATHER GERKEN
J. Skelly Wright Professor of Law, Yale University - Law School

JAMES RUSSELL GORDLEY
W.R. Irby Chair in Law, Tulane University Law School

GERALD HESS
Professor of Law, Gonzaga University - School of Law

CYNTHIA LEE
Professor of Law, George Washington University Law School

HOWARD LESNICK
Jefferson B. Fordham Professor of Law, University of Pennsylvania Law School

DAVID I. LEVINE
Professor of Law, University of California Hastings College of the Law

GRANT S. NELSON
Pepperdine University - School of Law

ROGER E. SCHECHTER
Professor of Law, George Washington University - Law School

JOAN M. SHAUGHNESSY
Professor of Law, Washington and Lee University - School of Law

ELAINE W. SHOBEN
Judge Jack & Lulu Lehman Professor of Law, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, William S. Boyd School of Law

STEPHANIE M. WILDMAN
John A. and Elizabeth H. Sutro Professor of Law, Santa Clara University - School of Law