LAW EDUCATOR: COURSES, MATERIALS & TEACHING eJOURNAL

"Empirical Research on the Core Competencies Needed to Practice Law: What Do Clients, New Lawyers, and Legal Employers Tell Us?" Free Download
The Bar Examiner, September 2014
U of St. Thomas (Minnesota) Legal Studies Research Paper No. 14-34

NEIL W. HAMILTON, University of St. Thomas School of Law (Minnesota)
Email:

Key stakeholders in legal services, legal education, and the professional regulation of lawyers are asking the following question: What are the core competencies needed for a new lawyer to practice law effectively and successfully? Since the focus of professions like law, medicine, the clergy, and the professorate is to provide assistance at a high level of commitment and professional competence to the person served (client, patient, parishioner, and student), a good place to start in answering this question would be to examine empirical research on what core competencies are needed by the person served. This article summarizes some of the empirical data available to answer this question.

"Drafting New York Civil-Litigation Documents: Part XXXV — Contempt Motions Continued" Free Download
New York State Bar Journal, Vol. 86, p. 64, September 2014

GERALD LEBOVITS, Columbia University - Law School, Fordham University School of Law, New York University School of Law, New York Law School
Email:

This article completes the discussion of contempt motions in the author's multi-part series on drafting civil-litigation papers for New York State courts.

"Illusions of Competence: Using Empirical Research on Undergraduate Study Behaviors to Maximize Law Learning" Free Download

JENNIFER M. COOPER, Seattle University School of Law
Email:

We all recognize that many incoming law students lack the critical thinking, reading, writing, and study skills required for law study. Empirical research reveals that these students also have “illusions of competence? in their thinking, writing, and study skills. These "illusions of competence" lead to reliance on ineffective and improvised study methods like rereading, cramming, and rote memorization.

Study strategies and habits are better predictors of effective learning and academic success than standardized test scores. Little empirical research exists on effective study skills and behaviors for academic success in law school. However, a wealth of empirical research has been done at the undergraduate level on study skills and behaviors.

Retrieval practice, the testing effect, spaced study, and periodic review are study skills and behaviors correlated with effective learning and academic success. While highlighting, rereading, and cramming are negatively correlated with academic success.

This Article summarizes the empirical findings on study skills and behaviors and suggests simple, practical ways to integrate this research into the law school classroom. Law professors (doctrinal, skills, and clinical), law students, and legal administrators will benefit from the research summary and the integration of research findings into the law school classroom.

"Mainstreaming the Progressive Law Approach to the Legal Education" Free Download

MARKUS Y HAGE, University of Nusa Cendana
Email:

The Legal Education is recently dominated by legal or doctrinal memorization (Satjipto Rahardjo: 2010). For the time being, the curriculum of Legal Education in several state campuses is considerably full of lessons of law in book instead of law in action. Integrating the course of legal aid for the underprivileged society is deemed to increase the burden of currently complex curriculum structure. In this regard, lecturers view the existing courses as the 'source of living’ which shall be maintained or broadened whereas their essence and output are merely for the formality of instructional system. Curriculum reformation shall become a firmly reconstructed awareness which is in favor with the renewal of course materials in line with the need of the society.

^top

About this eJournal

This eJournal is designed to offer a vehicle for law teachers to share information and materials about teaching. All materials related to law teaching are encouraged. This includes casebooks, reviews of casebooks, supplementary materials (for your own or someone else's book), lecture notes, class summaries, outlines, syllabi, problems and other teaching materials. It also includes scholarship about teaching. We hope that Law Educator will grow in future years to include a full range of teaching materials, including PowerPoint slides, Excel spreadsheets, video content and other material.

Submissions

To submit your research to SSRN, sign in to the SSRN User HeadQuarters, click the My Papers link on left menu and then the Start New Submission button at top of page.

Distribution Services

If your organization is interested in increasing readership for its research by starting a Research Paper Series, or sponsoring a Subject Matter eJournal, please email: RPS@SSRN.com

Distributed by

Legal Scholarship Network (LSN), a division of Social Science Electronic Publishing (SSEP) and Social Science Research Network (SSRN)

Directors

LSN SUBJECT MATTER EJOURNALS

BERNARD S. BLACK
Northwestern University - School of Law, Northwestern University - Kellogg School of Management, European Corporate Governance Institute (ECGI)
Email: bblack@northwestern.edu

RONALD J. GILSON
Stanford Law School, Columbia Law School, European Corporate Governance Institute (ECGI)
Email: rgilson@leland.stanford.edu

Please contact us at the above addresses with your comments, questions or suggestions for LSN-Sub.

Advisory Board

Law Educator: Courses, Materials & Teaching eJournal

CRAIG H. ALLEN
Judson Falknor Professor of Law, University of Washington - School of Law, Interim Director, UW Arctic Law and Policy Institute

DOROTHY ANDREA BROWN
Professor of Law, Emory University School of Law

JOHN S. DZIENKOWSKI
University of Texas - School of Law, The Center for Global Energy, International Arbitration, and Environmental Law

HEATHER GERKEN
J. Skelly Wright Professor of Law, Yale University - Law School

JAMES RUSSELL GORDLEY
W.R. Irby Chair in Law, Tulane University Law School

GERALD HESS
Professor of Law, Gonzaga University - School of Law

CYNTHIA LEE
Professor of Law, George Washington University Law School

HOWARD LESNICK
Jefferson B. Fordham Professor of Law, University of Pennsylvania Law School

DAVID I. LEVINE
Professor of Law, University of California Hastings College of the Law

GRANT S. NELSON
Pepperdine University - School of Law

ROGER E. SCHECHTER
affiliation not provided to SSRN

JOAN M. SHAUGHNESSY
Professor of Law, Washington and Lee University - School of Law

ELAINE W. SHOBEN
Judge Jack & Lulu Lehman Professor of Law, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, William S. Boyd School of Law

STEPHANIE M. WILDMAN
John A. and Elizabeth H. Sutro Professor of Law, Santa Clara University - School of Law