Table of Contents

The Readable Delaware General Corporation Law 2016-2017

Lynn M. LoPucki, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) - School of Law

Update on Privacy Legislation (Presentation Slides)

Rob van Eijk, Leiden University, Leiden Law School, Students

A Game-Theoretic Model of Cooperation in Law School Faculties

Shi-Ling Hsu, Florida State University - College of Law


LAW EDUCATOR: COURSES, MATERIALS & TEACHING eJOURNAL

"The Readable Delaware General Corporation Law 2016-2017" Free Download
UCLA School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 16-30

LYNN M. LOPUCKI, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) - School of Law
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VisiLaw is a system for marking statutes to make them easier to read. This paper contains a short introduction to VisiLaw and a complete, VisiLaw-marked copy of the Delaware General Corporation Law, including all laws through and including Delaware House Bill No. 371, signed by the Governor on June 16, 2016. The markings visually separate sentences, and clauses within sentences, making it easy to see where each begins and ends. The ability to see sentence structure at a glance makes it possible to read clauses one at a time, without losing orientation in the overall structure. Within each constituent clause, underlining identifies a skeletal sentence – subject, verb, direct object and a few other words. The underlining enables the reader to quickly get the gist, and understand the structure, of the constituent clauses. The Readable Delaware General Corporation Law is published in hard copy and is available on Amazon.

"Update on Privacy Legislation (Presentation Slides)" Free Download

ROB VAN EIJK, Leiden University, Leiden Law School, Students
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Presentation part of course 'Leadership challenges with big data.' The presentation leads to two conclusions against the background of big data. Four important legal developments; Update of fundamental legal building blocks: OECD Guidelines on the Protection of Privacy and Transborder Flows of Personal Data => updated in 2013. Council of Europe: Convention for the Protection of Individuals with regard to Automatic Processing of Personal Data (ETS No. 108) => stems from 1981 and under review. EU revision of the e-Privacy Directive 2002/58/EC amended by 2009/136/EC => review has started. Regulation (EU) 2016/679 of 27 April 2016 repealing Directive 95/46/EC.

"A Game-Theoretic Model of Cooperation in Law School Faculties" Free Download

SHI-LING HSU, Florida State University - College of Law
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A standard account of group cooperation would predict that group stability would bring about greater cooperation, because repeat-play games would allow for sanctions and rewards. In an academic unit such as a department or a law faculty, one might thus expect that faculty stability would bring about greater cooperation. Faculty turnover, by contrast, would cause faculty to invest less in each other, and depress cooperative behavior.

However, academic units are not like most other groups. Tenured professors face only limited sanctions for failing to cooperate, for engaging in unproductive conflict, or for shirking. It is thus open to question as to whether faculty turnover actually leads unambiguously to a decline in cooperation. This article posits that within limits, some faculty turnover may enhance cooperation. Certainly, excessive and persistent loss of faculty is demoralizing, and reduces the number of individuals among which administrative work can be spread. But for less dire losses, faculty turnover may play the disciplining role that academic units are deprived of by the tenure system.

This article sets forth a game-theoretic model showing how the possibility of exit may induce greater cooperation in a faculty. The intuition is that while some antisocial behavior in a faculty – fighting or shirking – may garner some short-term gains at the expense of others, the possibility of exit may reduce this behavior, on the grounds that loss of a colleague could be worse than the gains from fighting or shirking. Losing a colleague means probably losing a productive colleague, taking the time to replace her, and possibly replacing her with a less productive substitute. These downsides may play a role in curbing unproductive behavior in a faculty.

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Law Educator: Courses, Materials & Teaching eJournal

CRAIG H. ALLEN
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DOROTHY ANDREA BROWN
Professor of Law, Emory University School of Law

JOHN S. DZIENKOWSKI
University of Texas at Austin - The Kay Bailey Hutchison Center for Energy, Law & Business

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CYNTHIA LEE
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HOWARD LESNICK
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DAVID I. LEVINE
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Pepperdine University - School of Law

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JOAN M. SHAUGHNESSY
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ELAINE W. SHOBEN
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