Table of Contents

Follow the Money: Compensation, Risk, and the Financial Crisis

David F. Larcker, Stanford University - Graduate School of Business
Gaizka Ormazabal, University of Navarra, IESE Business School
Brian Tayan, Stanford University - Graduate School of Business
Daniel J. Taylor, University of Pennsylvania - The Wharton School

Teaching America's Antitrust Laws and Their Enforcement

Thomas Jeffrey Horton, University of South Dakota, School of Law

Coming Out in the Classroom: Law Professors, Law Students and Depression

Brian S. Clarke, Charlotte School of Law, Washington & Lee University School of Law


LAW EDUCATOR: COURSES, MATERIALS & TEACHING eJOURNAL

"Follow the Money: Compensation, Risk, and the Financial Crisis" Free Download
Rock Center for Corporate Governance at Stanford University Closer Look Series: Topics, Issues and Controversies in Corporate Governance No. CGRP-43
Stanford University Graduate School of Business Research Paper No. 14-34

DAVID F. LARCKER, Stanford University - Graduate School of Business
Email:
GAIZKA ORMAZABAL, University of Navarra, IESE Business School
Email:
BRIAN TAYAN, Stanford University - Graduate School of Business
Email:
DANIEL J. TAYLOR, University of Pennsylvania - The Wharton School
Email:

This Closer Look illustrates the relation between executive compensation and organizational risk through the context of the financial crisis of 2008. We demonstrate that the incentives that bankers had to increase firm risk not only increased but increased substantially in the years preceding the financial crisis.

We ask:

• How well do boards understand the relation between compensation and risk?
• How much attention do directors pay to the risk-taking incentives provided by CEO wealth?
• Do boards consider the relation between incentives and the risk tolerance of the firm?
• How much risk should an executive be encouraged to take?

The Closer Look series is a collection of short case studies through which we explore topics, issues, and controversies in corporate governance. In each study, we take a targeted look at a specific issue that is relevant to the current debate on governance and explain why it is so important. Larcker and Tayan are co-authors of the books Corporate Governance Matters and A Real Look at Real World Corporate Governance.

"Teaching America's Antitrust Laws and Their Enforcement" Free Download
American Journal of Legal History, Vol. 53, No. 4, p. 441, October 2013

THOMAS JEFFREY HORTON, University of South Dakota, School of Law
Email:

I have the great pleasure of teaching an interdisciplinary American Legal History seminar on "The History and Philosophy of America's Antitrust Laws and Their Enforcement." The course is designed to help students explore the historical, cultural, and philosophical underpinnings of America's antitrust laws while building their interdisciplinary research and writing, oral advocacy, and teamwork skills.

"Coming Out in the Classroom: Law Professors, Law Students and Depression" Free Download
Journal of Legal Education, Forthcoming

BRIAN S. CLARKE, Charlotte School of Law, Washington & Lee University School of Law
Email:

The evidence of a mental health crisis in law schools and in the legal profession is overwhelming and undeniable. Our students are suffering. Our former students, who are now our colleagues in the bar, are suffering. Despite the widespread nature of the problem, lawyers and law students (and law professors) who struggle with mental illness – whether depression, anxiety disorder, bipolar disorder, or something more serious – all too often suffer in silence and do their best to appear "normal" and "happy." Why? Because there remains a very real stigma attached to mental illness in the legal profession, where it is seen as a sign of weakness, a lack of dedication or a character flaw.

Given that today’s depressed law students will, more likely than not, be tomorrow’s depressed lawyers, law schools and the legal professoriate must bring the issue of mental illness out of the closet and into the open. We must do more to educate our students about mental illness and remove the stigma attached to it.

In this essay, I discuss how I "come out" about my mental illness in the classroom, share my personal struggles with my students, and use my struggles to teach my students about mental illness, the stresses of the legal profession, and strategies for addressing mental health while practicing law.

^top

About this eJournal

This eJournal is designed to offer a vehicle for law teachers to share information and materials about teaching. All materials related to law teaching are encouraged. This includes casebooks, reviews of casebooks, supplementary materials (for your own or someone else's book), lecture notes, class summaries, outlines, syllabi, problems and other teaching materials. It also includes scholarship about teaching. We hope that Law Educator will grow in future years to include a full range of teaching materials, including PowerPoint slides, Excel spreadsheets, video content and other material.

Submissions

To submit your research to SSRN, sign in to the SSRN User HeadQuarters, click the My Papers link on left menu and then the Start New Submission button at top of page.

Distribution Services

If your organization is interested in increasing readership for its research by starting a Research Paper Series, or sponsoring a Subject Matter eJournal, please email: RPS@SSRN.com

Distributed by

Legal Scholarship Network (LSN), a division of Social Science Electronic Publishing (SSEP) and Social Science Research Network (SSRN)

Directors

LSN SUBJECT MATTER EJOURNALS

BERNARD S. BLACK
Northwestern University - School of Law, Northwestern University - Kellogg School of Management, European Corporate Governance Institute (ECGI)
Email: bblack@northwestern.edu

RONALD J. GILSON
Stanford Law School, Columbia Law School, European Corporate Governance Institute (ECGI)
Email: rgilson@leland.stanford.edu

Please contact us at the above addresses with your comments, questions or suggestions for LSN-Sub.

Advisory Board

Law Educator: Courses, Materials & Teaching eJournal

CRAIG H. ALLEN
Judson Falknor Professor of Law, University of Washington - School of Law, Interim Director, UW Arctic Law and Policy Institute

DOROTHY ANDREA BROWN
Professor of Law, Emory University School of Law

JOHN S. DZIENKOWSKI
University of Texas - School of Law, The Center for Global Energy, International Arbitration, and Environmental Law

HEATHER GERKEN
J. Skelly Wright Professor of Law, Yale University - Law School

JAMES RUSSELL GORDLEY
W.R. Irby Chair in Law, Tulane University Law School

GERALD HESS
Professor of Law, Gonzaga University - School of Law

CYNTHIA LEE
Professor of Law, George Washington University Law School

HOWARD LESNICK
Jefferson B. Fordham Professor of Law, University of Pennsylvania Law School

DAVID I. LEVINE
Professor of Law, University of California Hastings College of the Law

GRANT S. NELSON
Pepperdine University - School of Law

ROGER E. SCHECHTER
affiliation not provided to SSRN

JOAN M. SHAUGHNESSY
Professor of Law, Washington and Lee University - School of Law

ELAINE W. SHOBEN
Judge Jack & Lulu Lehman Professor of Law, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, William S. Boyd School of Law

STEPHANIE M. WILDMAN
John A. and Elizabeth H. Sutro Professor of Law, Santa Clara University - School of Law