Table of Contents

New Challenges for International Economic Law Teaching and Research in México: Mexico's Outstanding Waves of Reforms

Ricardo García De La Rosa, Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México (ITAM)

Tools for the Clinical Professor: Applying Group Development Theory to Collaborative Learning in Law School Mediation Clinics

Donna Erez Navot, University of Wisconsin Law School

Math for Law Students

Terrance O'Reilly, Willamette University - College of Law

Drafting New York Civil-Litigation Documents: Part XXXVI — Motions to Reargue and Renew

Gerald Lebovits, Columbia University - Law School, Fordham University School of Law, New York University School of Law, New York Law School

Learning the 'How' of the Law: Teaching Procedure and Legal Education

David Bamford, Flinders University - School of Law
Trevor C. W. Farrow, York University - Osgoode Hall Law School
Michael M. Karayanni, Hebrew University of Jerusalem - Faculty of Law
Erik S. Knutsen, Queen's University Faculty of Law
Shirley Shipman, Oxford Brookes University
Elizabeth G. Thornburg, Southern Methodist University - Dedman School of Law

Resilient Lawyers: Maximising Well-Being in Legal Education and Practice

Colin G. James, Newcastle Law School; University of Newcastle Legal Centre


LAW EDUCATOR: COURSES, MATERIALS & TEACHING eJOURNAL

"New Challenges for International Economic Law Teaching and Research in México: Mexico's Outstanding Waves of Reforms" Free Download
FGV Direito SP Research Paper Series n. 108

RICARDO GARC?A DE LA ROSA, Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México (ITAM)
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This position paper argues that at this time of Mexico’s ongoing big transformation, legal educators and researchers in Mexico need to pay greater attention to international economic law, and that a renewal and perhaps some re-orientation of the approach to teaching international economic law, could provide significant contributions to and shape and support both the objectives and outcomes of reform in Mexico. International Economic Law courses and research can be made more useful, not only for students themselves, but also for their contribution towards the role that academics, lawyers, and other epistemic communities need to play in the political, economic and social evolution that is accelerating in Mexico.

"Tools for the Clinical Professor: Applying Group Development Theory to Collaborative Learning in Law School Mediation Clinics" Free Download
69 Dispute Resolution Journal 3 (2014)
Univ. of Wisconsin Legal Studies Research Paper No. 1330

DONNA EREZ NAVOT, University of Wisconsin Law School
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This article examines the theory of group development and collaborative learning as applied to the small group law school mediation clinic. In contrast to the large group traditional law school experience, a clinical legal education, composed of smaller groups, embraces collaborative learning that fosters professional and emotional growth among students. Group development often involves four stages: inclusion, control, affection, and termination. By drawing on the author's pedagogical experiences as a clinical law professor at the University of Wisconsin Law School Mediation Clinic, the author applies the four stages of group development to clinical legal education. The article finds that through an understanding and application of group development theory, clinical law school professors, especially ones who teach in small groups, can better support their students' legal and emotional learning. "The concept of group development is quite compelling. The idea that a group is more than the sum of its human parts and that group's move through predictable phases or stages is at once fascinating and a bit threatening."

"Math for Law Students" Free Download

TERRANCE O'REILLY, Willamette University - College of Law
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Topics include fractions, decimals, absolute value, powers/exponents, rounding, percent and percentage change, average, median, bytes, interest, future value, present discounted value and linear functions, with exercises.

"Drafting New York Civil-Litigation Documents: Part XXXVI — Motions to Reargue and Renew" Free Download
Gerald Lebovits, Drafting New York Civil-Litigation Documents: Part XXXVI—Motions to Reargue and Renew Continued, 86 N.Y. St. B.J. 64 (Oct. 2014).

GERALD LEBOVITS, Columbia University - Law School, Fordham University School of Law, New York University School of Law, New York Law School
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This article, which discusses motions to reargue and renew, is part of a continuing series on how to draft litigation documents in civil cases in New York.

"Learning the 'How' of the Law: Teaching Procedure and Legal Education" Free Download
Procedure and Legal Education Bamford, D., Farrow, T., Karayanni, M., Knutsen, E., Shipman, S., Thornburg, E. (2013). Learning the 'How' of the Law: Teaching Procedure and Legal Education. Osgoode Hall Law Journal, 51(1), 45-91.
Osgoode Legal Studies Research Paper No. 82/ 2014

DAVID BAMFORD, Flinders University - School of Law
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TREVOR C. W. FARROW, York University - Osgoode Hall Law School
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MICHAEL M. KARAYANNI, Hebrew University of Jerusalem - Faculty of Law
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ERIK S. KNUTSEN, Queen's University Faculty of Law
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SHIRLEY SHIPMAN, Oxford Brookes University
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ELIZABETH G. THORNBURG, Southern Methodist University - Dedman School of Law
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This article examines the approaches to teaching civil procedure in five common law jurisdictions (Canada, Australia, United States, Israel, and England). The paper demonstrates the important transition of civil procedure from a vocational oriented subject to a rigorous intellectual study of policies, processes, and values underpinning our civil justice system, and analysis of how that system operates. The advantages and disadvantages of where civil procedure fits within the curriculum are discussed and the significant opportunities for ‘active’ learning are highlighted. The inclusion of England where civil procedure is not taught to any significant degree in the law degree provides a valuable comparator. Common findings from the other jurisdictions suggest that teaching civil procedure enhances the curriculum by bringing it closer to what lawyers actually do as well as enabling a better understanding of the development of doctrinal law.

"Resilient Lawyers: Maximising Well-Being in Legal Education and Practice" 
Promoting Law Student and Lawyer Well-Being in Australia and Beyond (Ashgate), Forthcoming)

COLIN G. JAMES, Newcastle Law School; University of Newcastle Legal Centre
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Resilience is used here as the capacity to endure by adapting to adversity. It is essential for everyone who aspires to thrive in the legal profession. However it is not useful to advocate to law students and lawyers that they simply need a 'thick skin' in order to 'bounce back' from stressful experiences. In this chapter I use resilience not as a trait or a practice, but a personal quality that emerges from a dynamic relationship between the individual and his or her environment. It is dynamic because I use both ‘individual’ as a constantly changing-with-experience person, and 'environment' as the evolving yet wonderful complexity of human life, which includes the cultures of legal education and professional legal practice. Adopting this relationship approach to resilience is to understand it as an ecology, which I deconstruct for analysis into the domains of physical, cognitive, emotional and ethical fields of experience. The more we model, enable and motivate in ourselves, our students and colleagues the development of self-awareness through these domains, the more we will actually 'bounce forward' through challenges with purpose and a sense of acceptance that life in law necessarily involves difficult, even negative experiences that do not need to be a barrier to a good and happy life.

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Law Educator: Courses, Materials & Teaching eJournal

CRAIG H. ALLEN
Judson Falknor Professor of Law, University of Washington - School of Law, Interim Director, UW Arctic Law and Policy Institute

DOROTHY ANDREA BROWN
Professor of Law, Emory University School of Law

JOHN S. DZIENKOWSKI
University of Texas - School of Law, The Kay Bailey Hutchison Center for Energy, Law, and Business

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Pepperdine University - School of Law

ROGER E. SCHECHTER
affiliation not provided to SSRN

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ELAINE W. SHOBEN
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