Table of Contents

Can Law Students Disrupt the Market for High-Priced Textbooks?

Jane K. Winn, University of Washington - School of Law

Rules of Evidence for Your First Federal or New York Trial

Gerald Lebovits, Columbia University - Law School, Fordham University School of Law, New York University School of Law, New York Law School
Katerina Milonas, New York State Supreme Court

Teaching Compliance

D. Daniel Sokol, University of Florida - Levin College of Law, George Washington University Law School Competition Law Center

Antitrust Courses Can Teach Valuable Practical Skills -- If Taught Well

Steven J. Cernak, Schiff Hardin LLP, Michigan Law School, Wayne State University Law School, WMU Cooley Law School


LAW EDUCATOR: COURSES, MATERIALS & TEACHING eJOURNAL

"Can Law Students Disrupt the Market for High-Priced Textbooks?" Free Download
Washington Journal of Law, Technology & Arts, Forthcoming
University of Washington School of Law Research Paper No. 2015-20

JANE K. WINN, University of Washington - School of Law
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The Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction (CALI) is a non-profit organization whose mission is to advance legal education through technological innovation and collaboration. With its eLangdell Press project, CALI publishes American law school textbooks in open access, royalty-free form, offering faculty authors compensation equivalent to what most law school textbook authors would earn in royalties from a traditional full-price publisher. I am writing a new sales textbook and “agreements supplement� based on contemporary business practice that I will publish in open access form with CALI’s eLangdell Press. Relatively few other American legal academics publish in open access form, however, suggesting that the market for textbooks may be “locked-in� to a principal-agent conflict between students and faculty members. If American law students organized a website showing the textbook costs of all law faculty members at all law schools, they might be able to use a “naming and shaming� strategy to overcome faculty “lock-in� to high-priced textbooks and increase the adoption of open access textbooks.

"Rules of Evidence for Your First Federal or New York Trial" Free Download
Richmond County Bar Journal, 2015, Forthcoming

GERALD LEBOVITS, Columbia University - Law School, Fordham University School of Law, New York University School of Law, New York Law School
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KATERINA MILONAS, New York State Supreme Court
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You took evidence in law school. You studied evidence for the bar exam. But as you prepare for your first trial, you quickly realize that you do not know how to introduce evidence or ask a witness a question - or how to object to evidence or a question. If so, this article is for you. It covers the basic rules of evidence as they apply to federal and New York civil and criminal trials.

"Teaching Compliance" Free Download
University of Cincinnati Law Review, 2015

D. DANIEL SOKOL, University of Florida - Levin College of Law, George Washington University Law School Competition Law Center
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Compliance is a growing field of practice across multiple areas of law. Increasingly companies put compliance risk among the most important corporate governance issues facing them. Moreover, as “JD plus� jobs proliferate, the demand for hiring both at the entry level and for former students currently in practice who are experienced in the compliance field will continue to grow. The growth in compliance jobs comes at a time in shifting demand for legal jobs for law school graduates. Traditional law firm entry level jobs at large law firms, which were the staple of on campus recruiting before 2007, have not returned to pre-2007 levels even with the end of the recession. Technological changes, greater in-house hiring, and better creation of efficiencies have reduced demand for large law firms, which were the traditional training ground for in-depth legal skills and soft skills.

Law schools have responded to the demand shift in entry level hiring with a supply side response - classes in compliance. In some cases, law schools have set up compliance certificates or degrees in areas such as health care and business law. There is now even a casebook devoted to compliance. Yet, with all of these efforts at creating opportunities for careers in compliance, many programs and classes in compliance are nothing other than dressed up versions of classes in white collar crime or regulation or lectures on latest case developments that one might find in a continuing legal education program. These courses do not focus on the substantive areas needs practice with the highest demand for compliance (in-house legal and JD plus jobs) and do not teach the analytical skills necessary to succeed in such jobs. Nor do they focus on the special context within which compliance operates – ideally independent of the “business� but always a part of it. Essentially, law schools have misdiagnosed the demand side - it is not merely the particular type of class (compliance) but also the substance of such classes with the type of quality offering necessary to maximize student short term (entry level hiring) and long term (preparation for ever-shifting analytically complex practice challenges).

This Essay suggests an alternative approach to teaching compliance – one that focuses on the design and implementation of compliance programs. The Essay explores the determinants of why teaching compliance is important, the pitfalls of current approaches and the types of teaching innovations that sophisticated compliance practice requires. First, it explains what compliance is. Then, it explains the basis for the current economic drivers of the increased focus on compliance by firms. Next, it identifies the drivers of illegality before explaining how law school and in-house compliance training might be better structured in both analytical approach and substance. Finally, the Essay concludes with some thoughts about issues in compliance in which courses might place greater emphasis.

"Antitrust Courses Can Teach Valuable Practical Skills -- If Taught Well" Free Download
CPI Antitrust Chronicle -- June 2015

STEVEN J. CERNAK, Schiff Hardin LLP, Michigan Law School, Wayne State University Law School, WMU Cooley Law School
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Law schools are being pushed by accreditation bodies, law firms, and students themselves to offer additional practical alternatives for students, all in the search for experiential learning. Antitrust law, with arcane concepts like economist’s curves, Herfindahls, and two-sided markets, would not seem a good candidate for such learning. I believe, however, that antitrust law offers up several possible ways for professors to provide practical legal lessons useful to all future lawyers, even those who do not end up joining the antitrust community. In addition, antitrust courses can teach lessons about how the economy and businesses operate — and those lessons are valuable to the many students who have no real experience with either.

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Law Educator: Courses, Materials & Teaching eJournal

CRAIG H. ALLEN
Judson Falknor Professor of Law, University of Washington - School of Law, Interim Director, UW Arctic Law and Policy Institute

DOROTHY ANDREA BROWN
Professor of Law, Emory University School of Law

JOHN S. DZIENKOWSKI
University of Texas - School of Law, The Kay Bailey Hutchison Center for Energy, Law, and Business

HEATHER GERKEN
J. Skelly Wright Professor of Law, Yale University - Law School

JAMES RUSSELL GORDLEY
W.R. Irby Chair in Law, Tulane University Law School

GERALD HESS
Professor of Law, Gonzaga University - School of Law

CYNTHIA LEE
Professor of Law, George Washington University Law School

HOWARD LESNICK
Jefferson B. Fordham Professor of Law, University of Pennsylvania Law School

DAVID I. LEVINE
Professor of Law, University of California Hastings College of the Law

GRANT S. NELSON
Pepperdine University - School of Law

ROGER E. SCHECHTER
Professor of Law, George Washington University - Law School

JOAN M. SHAUGHNESSY
Professor of Law, Washington and Lee University - School of Law

ELAINE W. SHOBEN
Judge Jack & Lulu Lehman Professor of Law, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, William S. Boyd School of Law

STEPHANIE M. WILDMAN
John A. and Elizabeth H. Sutro Professor of Law, Santa Clara University - School of Law