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The eJournal is sponsored by the Syracuse University College of Law Disability Law and Policy (DLP) Program of the Syracuse University Center on Human Policy, Law, and Disability Studies (CHPLDS). The DLP Program sponsors a range of law school academic programs and co-curricular activities, including the first joint degree program in law and disability studies. The Program is part of the CHPLDS which is the first such university-wide network of academic programs, centers, student organizations, and affiliated faculty whose research, teaching, and advocacy promotes the rights of people with disabilities locally, nationally, and globally.


Table of Contents

Quality of Life in Detention: Results from the MQLD Questionnaire Data Collected in IRC Yarl's Wood, IRC Tinsley House and IRC Brook House, August 2010-June 2011

Mary Bosworth, University of Oxford - Faculty of Law, University of Oxford - Border Criminologies
Blerina Kellezi, University of Oxford - Centre for Criminology, University of Oxford - Border Criminologies

Mental Disorder, Criminality and the Literary Imagination

Herschel Prins, Loughborough University, University of Birmingham

The Medicaid Gamble

Ann Marie Marciarille, University of Missouri at Kansas City - School of Law


DISABILITY LAW eJOURNAL
Sponsored by Syracuse University Disability Law & Policy (DLP) Program

"Quality of Life in Detention: Results from the MQLD Questionnaire Data Collected in IRC Yarl's Wood, IRC Tinsley House and IRC Brook House, August 2010-June 2011" Free Download
Criminal Justice, Borders and Citizenship Research Paper No. 2448404

MARY BOSWORTH, University of Oxford - Faculty of Law, University of Oxford - Border Criminologies
Email:
BLERINA KELLEZI, University of Oxford - Centre for Criminology, University of Oxford - Border Criminologies
Email:

This report presents the results of a questionnaire, The Measure of the Quality of Life in Detention (MQLD), completed by 158 men and women residents of IRC Yarl’s Wood, IRC Tinsley House and IRC Brook House between August 2010-June 2011. The survey measures the detainees’ perceptions of a range of issues including their immigration case, their mental health and their quality of life.

"Mental Disorder, Criminality and the Literary Imagination" Fee Download
The Howard Journal of Criminal Justice, Vol. 53, Issue 3, pp. 290-308, 2014

HERSCHEL PRINS, Loughborough University, University of Birmingham

This contribution attempts to explore the use of a variety of literary sources as aids or ‘prompts’ to understanding those offenders and offender?patients whose mental states often raise considerable anxieties in those charged with their management. The word ‘prompt’ is borrowed from the work of my friend, the late doctor Murray Cox, and his co?worker Alice Theilgaard in their seminal work Shakespeare as Prompter (1994). The author of the present article hopes that its content will enable readers to focus more clearly on why we sometimes fail our offenders and offender?patients; in particular, through the mechanism of denial. The use of dramatic presentation when proffered with a unique blend of force and sensitivity can permit us to view puzzlement and horror from a safe distance and, at the same time, encourage us to increase our empathic understanding and professional practice. Most of the examples cited are brief allusions but, because her history is so compellingly applicable to our concerns in the present contribution, the ‘case’ of Lady Macbeth is considered in more detail. Finally, I would note some very wise words by Cox and Theilgaard (1994) in a caveat note to the reader: ‘Should the focus on therapy ever become occluded by preoccupation with poetic association, clinical skills would be diminished, distraction ensue and therapeutic contact deteriorate’ (not numbered). In the material that follows readers should bear such a cautionary note in mind.

"The Medicaid Gamble" Free Download
The Medicaid Gamble, Journal of Health Care Law & Policy, Forthcoming

ANN MARIE MARCIARILLE, University of Missouri at Kansas City - School of Law
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The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) was an unprecedented gamble. The ACA transformed Medicaid from an unevenly and underfunded program for the poor and disabled to a program to offer those priced out of commercial insurance markets government-funded health insurance similar to Medicare, the single-payer system for seniors and the disabled. In a sense, the ACA gambled that Medicaid could be more like Medicare.

The ACA, as it was transformed by the Supreme Court of the United States, became a gamble on the part of the Court that good things would follow from empowering each of the states to individually determine the fate of Medicaid expansion in its jurisdiction. Giving states the option to expand has given each of them enormous leverage in their bargaining with the federal executive and legislature over what shape their individual version of this jointly-funded state-federal program will take.

The ACA’s Medicaid expansion or non-expansion on the ground, as it is being carried out by the states cooperatively or uncooperatively with the federal government, is likely to be a third thing. The country is likely to see all possibilities happen at once, in different places. In some states, Medicaid is likely to become much more like Medicare. In others, Medicaid may change slowly and incrementally, if at all. And, in others, Medicaid may become more like exchange-mediated commercial insurance.

This article will address what these Medicaid gambles are, how these gambles are likely to resolve themselves, and whether Medicaid as we know it is likely to survive the ACA.

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Sponsored by: Syracuse University Disability Law & Policy (DLP) Program.


This eJournal distributes working and accepted paper abstracts which address issues of domestic, comparative, and international disability law and policy and disability studies, including  issues related to mental health and mental disability law and policy. The eJournal addresses legal issues, legislation, policy and a critical examination of disability as part of diversity in the US and in other societies throughout the world.

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