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Table of Contents

The Best-Seller as an Indicator of Societal Narcissism

Janet Rovenpor, Manhattan College
Richard E. Kopelman, City University of New York, CUNY Baruch College, Zicklin School of Business
Ann Cohen Brandwein, Baruch College - Zicklin School of Business, Department of Statistics & CIS
Phillip Quach, City University of New York, CUNY Baruch College, Zicklin School of Business
Marc Waldman, Manhattan College

Standard Lists of Creative Answers Leave Out Correct Solutions: An Example from PISA 2012

Alexander N. Poddiakov, National Research University Higher School of Economics (Moscow)

EFL Saudi Undergraduate Students' Use of Metacognitive Listening Strategies

Nasrin Altuwairesh, King Saud University


PHILOSOPHY OF MIND eJOURNAL

"The Best-Seller as an Indicator of Societal Narcissism" Free Download
Society. DOI 10.1007/s12115-016-0036-2

JANET ROVENPOR, Manhattan College
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RICHARD E. KOPELMAN, City University of New York, CUNY Baruch College, Zicklin School of Business
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ANN COHEN BRANDWEIN, Baruch College - Zicklin School of Business, Department of Statistics & CIS
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PHILLIP QUACH, City University of New York, CUNY Baruch College, Zicklin School of Business
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MARC WALDMAN, Manhattan College
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Narcissism has become inculcated in many aspects of modern society. It can be found in the growing popularity of social media which enable users to post selfies; in the competitive race for fame, beauty and extravagant lifestyles; and in the public’s fascination with power-hungry and greedy politicians and business people featured on television and in the movies. Narcissism thrives when members of society admire, flatter and promote individuals with grandiose ideas and fantastical dreams. This paper extends the research of Mullins and Kopelman (The Public Opinion Quarterly, 48: 720–730, 1984), which studied whether or not excessive concern with the self is on the rise, using bestsellers as an unobtrusive indicator of societal narcissism for the period, 1950–1979. Carrying this research forward for another thirty years, it was found over a 60-year period that the proportion of narcissistic-related bestsellers increased approximately 100% for hardcovers (from 19% to 35%); and also over a 19-year period for Amazon sales (from 15% to 35%).

"Standard Lists of Creative Answers Leave Out Correct Solutions: An Example from PISA 2012" Free Download

ALEXANDER N. PODDIAKOV, National Research University Higher School of Economics (Moscow)
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Interactive complex problem solving is an important 21st century skill (Neubert et al., 2015). Items of the PISA 2012 included interactive problems requiring exploration of a novel device (e.g., a virtual MP3-Player) and ideas for its modifications. The aim of our analysis is to show that the use of “standard lists of creative answers? used to assess creative problem solving can lead to missing some correct solutions. The object of the analysis is the fourth question of the MP3-Player Unit: “Describe how you could change the way the MP3 player works so that there is no need to have the bottom button?. Authors of the item write: “There is no single correct answer, and students may think creatively in devising a solution?. Nonetheless, they limit the number of correct answers to the six that are described in the guidelines. Other responses are not accepted and result in a score of 0 (PISA 2012). We argue that the authors’ list of correct answers is not complete: it includes neither double successive nor simultaneous clicks, even though “double-clicking? is a common ergonomic solution in modern devices. A possible paradoxical reason is that the authors agree entirely with their example of universal rules formulated about 15 years ago, before the era of multi-touch devices: “at no point two buttons have to be pressed simultaneously? (Greiff, 2012, p. 52). However, one can easily show that solutions based on different successive and simultaneous double-clicks should be included in the list of correct answers for the item (Poddiakov, 2012). The paradigm of assessing creative answers in accordance with lists of criteria prepared in advance (“standard lists of creative answers?) seems to be an oxymoron in the context of assessing 21st century skills and needs to be changed.

"EFL Saudi Undergraduate Students' Use of Metacognitive Listening Strategies" 
Arab World English Journal (AWEJ), Volume 7, Number 1, March 2016

NASRIN ALTUWAIRESH, King Saud University
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The main intent of the present study is to investigate the metacognitive listening strategies used by female Saudi students at the College of Languages & Translation (henceforth COLT) at King Saud University (henceforth KSU) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, when listening to texts in English. Two main research questions have been explored in the study: (1) Which of the five major types of metacognitive strategies do the participants use most when listening to English texts? and (2) What are the metacognitive listening strategies used most by the target group when listening to English texts? The Metacognitive Awareness Listening Questionnaire has been used to arrive at answers to the two research questions. Participants are 82 students from the same cohort. Results indicate that the participants (N=82) use problem-solving and directed attention strategies more commonly than the other metacognitive listening strategies; mental translation and person knowledge strategies are the least used by the participants.

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Philosophy of Mind eJournal

JULIA ELIZABETH ANNAS
Regents Professor of Philosophy, University of Arizona

DAVID CHALMERS
Professor of Philosophy, ARC Federation Fellow, Director - Center for Consciousness, Australian National University

MAUDEMARIE CLARK
Carleton Professor of Philosophy, Colgate University

CHRISTINE M. KORSGAARD
Arthur Kingsley Porter Professor of Philosophy, Harvard University

ALAN SIMMONS
Commonwealth Professor of Philosophy and Professor of Law, University of Virginia

ELLIOTT R. SOBER
Hans Reichenbach Professor of Philosophy and William F. Vilas Research Professor, University of Wisconsin

ERNEST SOSA
Professor of Philosophy, Rutgers University

BRIAN WEATHERSON
Associate Professor of Philosophy, Cornell University