Homely Thermoregulation: How Physical Coldness Makes an Advertised House a Home

31 Pages Posted: 11 Mar 2015 Last revised: 1 Oct 2015

See all articles by Bram Van Acker

Bram Van Acker

Tilburg University

Kayleigh Kerselaers

Ghent University-Universiteit Gent

Jennifer Pantophlet

Tilburg University

Hans IJzerman

Université Grenoble Alpes

Date Written: March 10, 2015

Abstract

House brokers typically intuit that any type of warmth cause people to buy houses more frequently. Is this empirical reality? The authors investigated this through people’s attachment towards advertised houses. A wealth of research has now linked thermoregulation to relationships (cf. IJzerman et al., 2015), and here the authors purport that this extends to people’s relationships with house as a more novel solution to an ancient problem: Shielding from the cold. The present package tests a preregistered idea that colder temperatures increase people’s need to affiliate and, in turn, increase people’s estimations of how homely a house is (measured through communality). The hypotheses of the first two studies were partly right: The authors only found that actual lower temperatures (not motivation and through a cup and outside temperature) induced people to find a house more communal, predicted by their need to affiliate. Importantly, this even predicts whether people find the house more attractive, and increases their willingness to pay for the house (Studies 1 and Study 2). The third study did not pan out as predicted, but still affected people’s need to affiliate. The authors reason that this was caused by a methodological shortcoming (namely not directly being affected by temperature). The present work provides novel insights into how a house becomes a home.

Keywords: grounded cognition, social thermoregulation, need for affiliation, home, communality, attachment

Suggested Citation

Van Acker, Bram and Kerselaers, Kayleigh and Pantophlet, Jennifer and IJzerman, Hans, Homely Thermoregulation: How Physical Coldness Makes an Advertised House a Home (March 10, 2015). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2576421 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2576421

Bram Van Acker

Tilburg University ( email )

P.O. Box 90153
Tilburg, DC 5000 LE
Netherlands

Kayleigh Kerselaers

Ghent University-Universiteit Gent ( email )

Coupure Links 653
Gent, 9000
Belgium

Jennifer Pantophlet

Tilburg University ( email )

P.O. Box 90153
Tilburg, DC 5000 LE
Netherlands

Hans IJzerman (Contact Author)

Université Grenoble Alpes ( email )

Grenoble
France

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