Michal Herzenstein

University of Delaware

Newark, DE 19711

United States

SCHOLARLY PAPERS

9

DOWNLOADS
Rank 16,298

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Top 16,298

in Total Papers Downloads

2,868

CITATIONS

1

Scholarly Papers (9)

1.

When Words Sweat: Identifying Signals for Loan Default in the Text of Loan Applications

Columbia Business School Research Paper No. 16-83
Number of pages: 83 Posted: 07 Nov 2016 Last Revised: 12 Feb 2019
Oded Netzer, Alain Lemaire and Michal Herzenstein
Columbia Business School - Marketing, Columbia University, Columbia Business School, Marketing, Students and University of Delaware
Downloads 1,078 (18,827)

Abstract:

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loan default, text mining, consumer finance, machine learning

2.

Strategic Herding Behavior in Peer-to-Peer Loan Auctions

Number of pages: 32 Posted: 27 Apr 2010
Michal Herzenstein, Utpal M. Dholakia and Rick Andrews
University of Delaware, Rice University - Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Business and University of Delaware
Downloads 858 (26,305)
Citation 1

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Online auctions, bidding behavior, herding behavior, peer-to-peer lending

3.

Tell Me a Good Story and I May Lend You My Money: The Role of Narratives in Peer-to-Peer Lending Decisions

Number of pages: 44 Posted: 15 May 2011 Last Revised: 17 Aug 2011
Michal Herzenstein, Scott Sonenshein and Utpal M. Dholakia
University of Delaware, Rice University and Rice University - Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Business
Downloads 755 (31,431)

Abstract:

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Identities, narratives, peer-to-peer lending, decision making under uncertainty, consumer financial decision making

4.

Optimal Marketing for Really New Products: Using a Consumer Perspective to Improve Communications

CRACKING THE CODE, Steve Posavac, ed., 2011
Number of pages: 38 Posted: 05 Aug 2011
Steve Hoeffler and Michal Herzenstein
Vanderbilt University - Marketing and University of Delaware
Downloads 177 (165,827)

Abstract:

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5.

Living with Terrorism or Withdrawing in Terror: Perceived Control and Consumer Avoidance

Journal of Consumer Behaviour, 14: 228–236 (2015)
Posted: 22 Sep 2015 Last Revised: 11 Mar 2016
Michal Herzenstein, Sharon Horsky and Steven S. Posavac
University of Delaware, Hebrew University of Jerusalem - Jerusalem School of Business Administration and Vanderbilt University - Marketing

Abstract:

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terrorism; choice; protection motivation theory; desire for control

6.

Adoption of New and Really New Products: The Effects of Self-Regulation Systems and Risk Salience

Journal of Marketing Research, Vol. XLIV , No. 251, pp. 251-260, May, 2007
Posted: 18 Aug 2011
Michal Herzenstein and Steven S. Posavac
University of Delaware and Vanderbilt University - Marketing

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7.

Profits and Halos: The Role of Firm Profitability Information in Consumer Inference

Journal of Consumer Psychology, Vol. 20, pp. 327-337, 2010
Posted: 18 Aug 2011
Vanderbilt University - Marketing, University of Delaware, University of Cincinnati - Department of Marketing and affiliation not provided to SSRN

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Inference, Advertising effectiveness, Behavioral decision making

8.

The Role of Decision Importance and the Salience of Alternatives in Determining the Consistency Between Consumers’ Attitudes and Decisions

Marketing Letters, Vol. 14, No. 1, pp. 47–57, 2003
Posted: 17 Aug 2011
Steven S. Posavac, Michal Herzenstein and David M. Sanbonmatsu
Vanderbilt University - Marketing, University of Delaware and University of Utah - Department of Psychology

Abstract:

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attitude-decision consistency, memory, generation of alternatives

9.

How Consumers’ Attitudes toward Direct-to-Consumer Advertising of Prescription Drugs Influence and Effectiveness, and Consumer and Physician Behavior

Marketing Letters, Vol. 15, No. 4, pp. 201-212, 2004
Posted: 17 Aug 2011
Michal Herzenstein, Sanjog Misra and Steven S. Posavac
University of Delaware, University of Chicago - Booth School of Business and Vanderbilt University - Marketing

Abstract:

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direct-to-consumer advertising, consumer behavior