J. Adam Cobb

University of Texas at Austin - Red McCombs School of Business

2110 Speedway, B6000

Austin, TX 78705

United States

SCHOLARLY PAPERS

4

DOWNLOADS

664

SSRN CITATIONS

4

CROSSREF CITATIONS

1

Scholarly Papers (4)

1.

Growing Apart: The Changing Firm-Size Wage Effect and Its Inequality Consequences

Number of pages: 53 Posted: 29 May 2016
J. Adam Cobb, Ken-Hou Lin and Paige Gabriel
University of Texas at Austin - Red McCombs School of Business, University of Texas at Austin - Department of Sociology and University of Texas at Austin
Downloads 397 (83,603)
Citation 3

Abstract:

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Inequality; Firm-Size Wage Effect; Employment; Organization

2.

Take a Stand or Keep Your Seat: Board Turnover after Social Movement Boycotts

Academy of Management Journal, Forthcoming
Number of pages: 55 Posted: 07 Jun 2019 Last Revised: 30 Sep 2019
Mary-Hunter McDonnell and J. Adam Cobb
The Wharton School - The University of Pennsylvania and University of Texas at Austin - Red McCombs School of Business
Downloads 141 (231,600)
Citation 2

Abstract:

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board turnover, corporate social responsibility, social movements, political ideology

3.

When Principals Conflict: Stakeholder Power, Executive Decision-Making, and the Manipulation of Pension Assumptions

Number of pages: 49 Posted: 16 Apr 2016
J. Adam Cobb
University of Texas at Austin - Red McCombs School of Business
Downloads 80 (342,406)

Abstract:

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corporate governance, earnings management, human resource practices, ownership, power, retirement plans, shareholder value

4.

Firm Partisan Political Positioning, Affective Polarization, and Risk Communication: Examining Firms’ Voluntary Disclosures on COVID-19

Number of pages: 55 Posted: 18 May 2020 Last Revised: 11 Nov 2020
Richard Benton, J. Adam Cobb and Timothy Werner
University of Illinois, University of Texas at Austin - Red McCombs School of Business and University of Texas at Austin - Red McCombs School of Business
Downloads 46 (450,165)

Abstract:

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affective polarization; corporate political activity; COVID-19; managerial risk; risk disclosure