Gerald S. Reamey

St. Mary's University School of Law

Professor of Law

SCHOLARLY PAPERS

5

DOWNLOADS

397

CITATIONS

0

Scholarly Papers (5)

1.

Innovation or Renovation in Criminal Procedure: Is the World Moving Toward a New Model of Adjudication?

Arizona Journal of International & Comparative Law, Vol. 27, p. 324, 2010
Number of pages: 100 Posted: 22 Aug 2010
Gerald S. Reamey
St. Mary's University School of Law
Downloads 127 (167,584)

Abstract:

criminal procedure, comparative, international, harmonize, adversarial

2.

The Promise of Things to Come: Anticipatory Warrants in Texas

Baylor Law Review, Forthcoming
Number of pages: 38 Posted: 25 Jan 2013 Last Revised: 09 Feb 2013
Gerald S. Reamey
St. Mary's University School of Law
Downloads 52 (295,200)

Abstract:

Texas criminal procedure, search and seizure, anticipatory search warrants, anticipatory warrant, search, criminal procedure

3.

What's Fear Got to Do with it?: The 'Armed and Dangerous' Requirement of Terry

Number of pages: 43 Posted: 29 Mar 2016
Gerald S. Reamey
St. Mary's University School of Law
Downloads 0 (295,200)

Abstract:

search and seizure, stop and frisk, frisk, pat-down, armed and dangerous, search, Terry v. Ohio, protective search, reasonable suspicion, investigative detention, detention, Terry stop, weapon search

4.

Deadly Misunderstandings About Police Use of Deadly Force

Texas Police Journal (March/April 2016)
Number of pages: 8 Posted: 20 Mar 2016
Gerald S. Reamey
St. Mary's University School of Law
Downloads 0 (297,667)

Abstract:

police, law enforcement, Texas law, justification, use of force, use of deadly force, castle doctrine, force to prevent escape, force to effect arrest

5.

The Truth Might Set You Free: How the Michael Morton Act Could Fundamentally Change Texas Criminal Discovery, Or Not

Number of pages: 46 Posted: 27 Sep 2015
Gerald S. Reamey
St. Mary's University School of Law
Downloads 0 (259,755)

Abstract:

Texas criminal procedure, criminal discovery, Michael Morton Act, Article 39.14, Texas discovery, Texas wrongful conviction