Is There More than One Citizen Under the U. S. Constitution? - Slaughterhouse Revisited

44 Pages Posted: 10 Aug 2007  

Dan Goodman

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Date Written: 2007

Abstract

Citizenship under the Constitution was changed by the Fourteenth Amendment. Before the Fourteenth Amendment there was only one class of citizens under the Constitution of the United States. After the adoption of the Fourteenth Amendment, the Supreme Court, in the Slaughterhouse Cases, decided that there were two citizens under the Constitution of the United States.

However, the legal authority stemming from this decision is divided; with one being correct, the other incorrect. This cannot exist. Lex uno ore omnes alloquitur.

Under the correct line of legal authority The United States of America is a Republic. Its citizens hold a dual citizenship. They are a citizen of the State in which they reside, and a citizen of the several States, or, of the United States.

Keywords: Citizenship, Slaughterhouse Cases, legal authority, Fourteenth Amendment, several States, dual citizenship

JEL Classification: K19, H19, I29, K39, Z00

Suggested Citation

Goodman, Dan, Is There More than One Citizen Under the U. S. Constitution? - Slaughterhouse Revisited (2007). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1006147 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1006147

Dan Goodman (Contact Author)

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

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