Confounding Extremities: Surgery at the Medico-Ethical Limits of Self Modification

11 Pages Posted: 12 Aug 2007  

Annemarie Bridy

University of Idaho College of Law; Stanford University Center for Internet and Society

Abstract

This article discusses the debate over apotemnophilia and its diagnosis and treatment, focusing on the bioethical, legal, and cultural implications of elective amputation as a possible therapy. The author argues that the sensationalism surrounding apotemnophilia should not be allowed to deter the thoughtful interdisciplinary inquiry that is appropriate to this debate, which raises important questions about the definition of bodily integrity, the process of medical standard-setting, and the limits of physician and patient autonomy when it comes to surgical modification of the body.

Keywords: apotemnophilia, surgery, bodily integrity, sex disorders

JEL Classification: I19

Suggested Citation

Bridy, Annemarie, Confounding Extremities: Surgery at the Medico-Ethical Limits of Self Modification. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics, Vol. 32, No. 1, 2004. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1006644

Annemarie Bridy (Contact Author)

University of Idaho College of Law ( email )

Idaho Law & Justice Learning Center
PO Box 83720
Boise, ID 83720-0051
United States
(208) 364-4583 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.uidaho.edu/law/faculty/annemariebridy

Stanford University Center for Internet and Society ( email )

Idaho Law & Justice Learning Center
PO Box 83720
Boise, ID 83720-0051
United States
(208) 364-4583 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.uidaho.edu/law/faculty/annemariebridy

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