Suing One's Sense Faculties for Fraud: 'Justifiable Reliance' in the Law as a Clue to Epistemic Justification

Philosophical Papers, Vol. 36, p. 49, 2007

42 Pages Posted: 27 Aug 2007

See all articles by Christopher R. Green

Christopher R. Green

University of Mississippi - School of Law

Abstract

The law requires that plaintiffs in fraud cases be 'justified' in relying on a misrepresentation. I deploy the accumulated intuitions of the law to defend externalist accounts of epistemic justification and knowledge against Laurence BonJour's counterexamples involving clairvoyance. I suggest that the law can offer a well-developed model for adding a no-defeater condition to either justification or knowledge but without requiring that subjects possess positive reasons to believe in the reliability of an epistemic source.

Keywords: law and epistemology, Laurence BonJour, clairvoyant examples, externalism, internalism, justification, justified reliance, justifiable reliance, fraud

Suggested Citation

Green, Christopher R., Suing One's Sense Faculties for Fraud: 'Justifiable Reliance' in the Law as a Clue to Epistemic Justification. Philosophical Papers, Vol. 36, p. 49, 2007. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1007156

Christopher R. Green (Contact Author)

University of Mississippi - School of Law ( email )

Lamar Law Center
P.O. Box 1848
University, MS 38677
United States

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