Enhancing the Television-Viewing Experience through Commercial Interruptions

13 Pages Posted: 21 Aug 2007 Last revised: 21 Jan 2009

Leif D. Nelson

University of California, Berkeley - Haas School of Business

Tom Meyvis

New York University (NYU) - Department of Marketing

Jeff Galak

Carnegie Mellon University

Date Written: 2009

Abstract

Consumers prefer to watch television programs without commercials. Yet, in spite of most consumers' extensive experience with watching television, we propose that commercial interruptions can actually improve the television viewing experience. Although consumers do not foresee it, their enjoyment diminishes over time. Commercial interruptions can disrupt this adaptation process and restore the intensity of consumers' enjoyment. Six studies demonstrate that, although people preferred to avoid commercial interruptions, these interruptions actually made programs more enjoyable (study 1), regardless of the quality of the commercial (study 2), even when controlling for the mere presence of the ads (study 3), and regardless of the nature of the interruption (study 4). However, this effect was eliminated for people who are less likely to adapt (study 5), and for programs that do not lead to adaptation (study 6), confirming the disruption of adaptation account and identifying crucial boundaries of the effect.

Keywords: Television, Advertising, Hedonic

Suggested Citation

Nelson, Leif D. and Meyvis, Tom and Galak, Jeff, Enhancing the Television-Viewing Experience through Commercial Interruptions (2009). Journal of Consumer Research, Vol. 36, August 2009. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1007767

Leif D. Nelson (Contact Author)

University of California, Berkeley - Haas School of Business ( email )

545 Student Services Building, #1900
2220 Piedmont Avenue
Berkeley, CA 94720
United States

Tom Meyvis

New York University (NYU) - Department of Marketing ( email )

Henry Kaufman Ctr
44 W 4 St.
New York, NY
United States

Jeff Galak

Carnegie Mellon University ( email )

Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3890
United States
412-268-5810 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.jeffgalak.com

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