Malaria: Disease Impacts and Long-Run Income Differences

34 Pages Posted: 11 Sep 2007

See all articles by Douglas Gollin

Douglas Gollin

Oxford Department of International Development; Williams College; Yale University

Christian Zimmermann

Federal Reserve Bank of Saint Louis; IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Date Written: August 2007

Abstract

The World Health Organization (WHO) reports that malaria, a parasitic disease transmitted by mosquitoes, causes over 300 million episodes of "acute illness" and more than one million deaths annually. Most of the deaths occur in poor countries of the tropics, and especially sub-Saharan Africa. Some researchers have suggested that ecological differences associated with malaria prevalence are perhaps the most important reason why some countries today are rich and others poor. This paper explores the question in an explicit dynamic general equilibrium framework, using a calibrated model that incorporates epidemiological features into a standard general equilibrium framework.

Keywords: malaria, epidemiology, GDP, disease prevention, sub-Saharan Africa

JEL Classification: I1, O11, E13, E21

Suggested Citation

Gollin, Douglas and Zimmermann, Christian, Malaria: Disease Impacts and Long-Run Income Differences (August 2007). IZA Discussion Paper No. 2997. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1012564

Douglas Gollin

Oxford Department of International Development ( email )

Queen Elizabeth House
3 Mansfield Road
Oxford, OX1 3TB
United Kingdom

Williams College ( email )

Fernald House
Williamstown, MA 01267
United States

Yale University ( email )

28 Hillhouse Ave
New Haven, CT 06520-8264
United States

Christian Zimmermann (Contact Author)

Federal Reserve Bank of Saint Louis ( email )

411 Locust St
Saint Louis, MO 63011
United States

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

Here is the Coronavirus
related research on SSRN

Paper statistics

Downloads
245
Abstract Views
1,412
rank
134,255
PlumX Metrics