Civilizing Security

CIVILIZING SECURITY, Cambridge University Press, 2007

Oxford Legal Studies Research Paper No. 17/2007

Posted: 17 Sep 2007

See all articles by Ian Loader

Ian Loader

University of Oxford - Faculty of Law

Neil Walker

University of Edinburgh, School of Law

Abstract

Security has become a defining feature of contemporary public discourse, permeating the so-called 'war on terror', problems of everyday crime and disorder, the reconstruction of 'weak' or 'failed' states, and the dramatic renaissance of the private security industry. But what does it mean for individuals to be secure, and what is the relationship between security and the practices of the modern state? In this timely and important book, Ian Loader and Neil Walker outline and defend the view that security remains a valuable public good, a platform for and education in political society, and argue that the democratic state has a necessary and virtuous role to play in its realization. While the state may no longer be suited to or capable of sustaining the monopoly position suggested by the classic Westphalian understanding of national and international society, it remains, Loader and Walker argue, indispensable to the task of fostering liveable political communities in the contemporary world - pivotal to the project of civilizing security and releasing security's civilizing potential. This major intervention by two leading scholars in the field will be of interest to anyone wishing to deepen their understanding of one the most significant and pressing issues of our times.

Suggested Citation

Loader, Ian and Walker, Neil, Civilizing Security. CIVILIZING SECURITY, Cambridge University Press, 2007; Oxford Legal Studies Research Paper No. 17/2007. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1014846

Ian Loader (Contact Author)

University of Oxford - Faculty of Law ( email )

St. Cross Building
St. Cross Road
Oxford, OX1 3UJ
United Kingdom

Neil Walker

University of Edinburgh, School of Law ( email )

Old College
South Bridge
Edinburgh, EH8 9YL
United Kingdom

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