The Effects of Work-Conditioned Transfers on Marriage and Child Well-Being: A Review

51 Pages Posted: 15 Oct 2007 Last revised: 11 Dec 2007

See all articles by Jeffrey Grogger

Jeffrey Grogger

University of Chicago - Harris School of Public Policy; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Lynn A. Karoly

RAND Corporation - Santa Monica CA Offices

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Date Written: October 2007

Abstract

Transfer payments to poor families are increasingly conditioned on work, either via wage subsidies available only to workers or via work requirements in more traditional welfare programs. Although the effects of such programs on employment are fairly well understood, relatively little is known about their effects on marriage or child well-being. We review a small number of studies that provide such information here. Our discussion of marriage is couched in terms of a theoretical model that draws from the efficient-household literature. The model is consistent with the wide range of effects that we observe and suggests an explanation for some of the observed differences. The theoretical framework in which we couch our review of results on children is likewise consistent with the observed variation between programs and among children of different ages.

Suggested Citation

Grogger, Jeffrey T. and Karoly, Lynn A., The Effects of Work-Conditioned Transfers on Marriage and Child Well-Being: A Review (October 2007). NBER Working Paper No. w13485. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1020911

Jeffrey T. Grogger (Contact Author)

University of Chicago - Harris School of Public Policy ( email )

1155 East 60th Street
Chicago, IL 60637
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Lynn A. Karoly

RAND Corporation - Santa Monica CA Offices ( email )

P.O. Box 2138
1776 Main Street
Santa Monica, CA 90407-2138
United States

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