War Stories: A Reflection on Defending an Alleged Enemy Combatant Detained in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba

Yearbook of New Zealand Jurisprudence, Vol. 8, p. 193, 2005

24 Pages Posted: 15 Oct 2007 Last revised: 21 Oct 2007

See all articles by Richard J. Wilson

Richard J. Wilson

The John Marshall Law School - Acting Associate Dean for Clinical Education; American University - Washington College of Law

Abstract

This paper arose from a presentation at the McCoubrey Centre for International Law at Hull University in the United Kingdom, at a conference on "Law and Security, Post 9/11". The conference took place in February of 2005 and represents reflections on my personal experience in the representation of Omar Khadr, a Canadian citizen who was captured by U.S. and Northern Alliance forces near Khost, Afghanistan, in July, 2002. He was held at Bagram Air Force Base for several months, and transferred to Guantanamo Bay, where he has been held ever since. He was 15 years old at the time of his capture. The article discusses who was at Guantanamo as of the date of its writing, why the U.S. government's detention policy unfolded the way it did, who our client is, and what the ideal outcome of his case would be.

Keywords: Guantanamo, Military Commission, human rights, enemy combatant, criminal law, criminal procedure, law of war, Canada

JEL Classification: K14, K33, K41, K42

Suggested Citation

Wilson, Richard J., War Stories: A Reflection on Defending an Alleged Enemy Combatant Detained in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Yearbook of New Zealand Jurisprudence, Vol. 8, p. 193, 2005. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1021342

Richard J. Wilson (Contact Author)

The John Marshall Law School - Acting Associate Dean for Clinical Education ( email )

315 S. Plymouth Ct
Chicago, IL 60604

American University - Washington College of Law

4300 Nebraska Avenue N.W.
Washington, DC 20016
United States

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
148
rank
185,361
Abstract Views
1,577
PlumX