When Does the Past Repeat Itself? The Interplay of Behavior Prediction and Personal Norms

36 Pages Posted: 17 Oct 2007 Last revised: 10 Feb 2012

See all articles by Pierre Chandon

Pierre Chandon

INSEAD

Ronn J. Smith

University of Arkansas

Vicki Morwitz

New York University (NYU) - Department of Marketing

Eric Richard Spangenberg

University of California, Irvine

David Sprott

Washington State University

Date Written: January 24, 2011

Abstract

Does asking people about their future behavior increase or decrease the likelihood that they will repeat their past behavior? In two laboratory and two field experiments, we find that behavior prediction strengthens behavior repetition, making people more likely to do what they normally do, when personal norms regarding engaging in a behavior are weak or not easily accessible. However, when personal norms are strong or made accessible at the time of the prediction request, behavior prediction weakens behavior repetition and increases the likelihood that people do what they think they should do—even if it’s not what they normally would do. These findings provide new tools for influencing behavior repetition, reconcile some seemingly contradictory past findings, and contribute to the debate regarding the relative importance of habits and intentions in guiding behavior.

Suggested Citation

Chandon, Pierre and Smith, Ronn J. and Morwitz, Vicki and Spangenberg, Eric Richard and Sprott, David, When Does the Past Repeat Itself? The Interplay of Behavior Prediction and Personal Norms (January 24, 2011). Journal of Consumer Research, Forthcoming; INSEAD Business School Research Paper No. 2011/10/MKT. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1021719

Pierre Chandon (Contact Author)

INSEAD ( email )

Boulevard de Constance
77305 Fontainebleau Cedex
France

Ronn J. Smith

University of Arkansas ( email )

Fayetteville, AR 72701
United States

Vicki Morwitz

New York University (NYU) - Department of Marketing ( email )

Henry Kaufman Ctr
44 W 4 St.
New York, NY
United States

Eric Richard Spangenberg

University of California, Irvine ( email )

4293 Pereira Drive
Suite 5600
Irvine, CA 92697-3125
United States
949-824-8470 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Eric_Spangenberg

David Sprott

Washington State University ( email )

Wilson Rd.
College of Business
Pullman, WA 99164
United States

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
78
rank
304,493
Abstract Views
1,243
PlumX Metrics
!

Under construction: SSRN citations will be offline until July when we will launch a brand new and improved citations service, check here for more details.

For more information