Privacy and the New Virtualism

57 Pages Posted: 21 Nov 2007 Last revised: 17 Jun 2018

Jon Penney

University of Oxford - Oxford Internet Institute; Citizen Lab, University of Toronto; Princeton University - Center for Information Technology Policy; Harvard University - Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society; Dalhousie University - Schulich School of Law

Date Written: 2008

Abstract

First generation cyberlaw scholars were deeply influenced by the uniqueness of cyberspace, and believed its technology and scope meant it could not be controlled by any government. Few still ascribe to this utopian vision. However, there is now a growing body of second generation cyberlaw scholarship that speaks not only to the differential character of cyberspace, but also analyzes legal norms within virtual spaces while drawing connections to our experience in real space. I call this the New Virtualism. Situated within this emerging scholarship, this article offers a new approach to privacy in virtual spaces by drawing on what Orin Kerr calls the internalist or virtualist perspective. The virtualist approach to privacy shifts the focus away from the concept of privacy itself, which has been over theorized and categorized by privacy theorists, to analyzing and theorizing persons in virtual environments and how they ought to be understood. It focuses on virtual persons and the distinct privacy concerns they raise, and reconnects ideas about informational and data privacy to traditional normative justifications for privacy based on personhood. Adopting a virtualist approach to privacy has conceptual, normative, constitutional, and public policy benefits.

Keywords: Privacy, cyberspace, technology, virtualism, virtualist, realist, internal, externalist, constitution, information privacy, fair information practices, whalen, roe, state action doctrine,

JEL Classification: K19

Suggested Citation

Penney, Jon, Privacy and the New Virtualism (2008). 10 Yale Journal of Law & Technology 194, 2008. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1031045

Jonathon Penney (Contact Author)

University of Oxford - Oxford Internet Institute ( email )

1 St. Giles
University of Oxford
Oxford OX1 3PG Oxfordshire, Oxfordshire OX1 3JS
United Kingdom

Citizen Lab, University of Toronto ( email )

Munk School of Global Affairs
University of Toronto
Toronto, Ontario M5S 3K7
Canada

Princeton University - Center for Information Technology Policy ( email )

C231A E-Quad
Olden Street
Princeton, NJ 08540
United States

Harvard University - Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society ( email )

Harvard Law School
23 Everett, 2nd Floor
Cambridge, MA Nova Scotia 02138
Canada

Dalhousie University - Schulich School of Law ( email )

6061 University Avenue
PO Box 15000
Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2
Canada

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
650
rank
36,150
Abstract Views
1,453
PlumX