When Constituencies Speak in Multiple Tongues: The Relative Persuasiveness of Hawkish Minorities in Representative Negotiation

36 Pages Posted: 5 Dec 2007

See all articles by Wolfgang Steinel

Wolfgang Steinel

Leiden University - Social and Organizational Psychology

Carsten K. W. De Dreu

University of Amsterdam - Department of Psychology

Elsje Ouwehand

University of Amsterdam

Jimena Ramírez-Marín

University of Amsterdam

Date Written: 2007

Abstract

In three experiments, we examined how people negotiate on behalf of a constituency in which opposing factions send different signals. Participants negotiated as sellers on behalf of a group consisting of factions that favored either a cooperative or a competitive negotiation. Experiment 1 (N = 61) showed that representative follow the majority of their constituents, yet competitive (but not cooperative) minorities could challenge the majority's influence. Experiment 2 (N = 132) replicated this finding across different decision rule conditions. Competitive minorities were influential, no matter whether the group would decide unanimously or with majority vote. Experiment 3 (N = 87) showed that competitive members had more influence than cooperative members, even when factions were equally large. We conclude that the influence of a minority faction in intergroup negotiation depends on the specific content of the faction's message, and its strategic implications. We discuss implications for negotiation research and intergroup theories.

Keywords: Representative Negotiation, Intergroup Negotiation, Homogeneous or Heterogeneous Constituency, Intragroup Conflict, Social Influence, Decision Rules

Suggested Citation

Steinel, Wolfgang and De Dreu, Carsten K. W. and Ouwehand, Elsje and Ramírez-Marín, Jimena, When Constituencies Speak in Multiple Tongues: The Relative Persuasiveness of Hawkish Minorities in Representative Negotiation (2007). IACM 2007 Meetings Paper, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1031681 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1031681

Wolfgang Steinel (Contact Author)

Leiden University - Social and Organizational Psychology ( email )

Leiden, 2300 RA
Netherlands

Carsten K. W. De Dreu

University of Amsterdam - Department of Psychology ( email )

Roetersstraat 15
Amsterdam, 1018 WB
Netherlands
+31 20 525 6865 (Phone)
+31 20 639 0531 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://www.psy.uva.nl/ResEdu/AO/People/Dreu/deDreu.html

Elsje Ouwehand

University of Amsterdam ( email )

Spui 21
Amsterdam, 1018 WB
Netherlands

Jimena Ramírez-Marín

University of Amsterdam ( email )

Spui 21
Amsterdam, 1018 WB
Netherlands

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