New Men and New Women?: A Comparison of Paid Work Propensities from a Panel Data Perspective

CEPR Discussion Paper Series No. 1775

Posted: 7 Jul 1998

See all articles by Alison L. Booth

Alison L. Booth

Australian National University (ANU) - Research School of Social Sciences (RSSS); Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR); IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Stephen P. Jenkins

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - Department of Social Policy and Administration; Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA); University of Essex - Institute for Social and Economic Research (ISER)

Carlos García Serrano

Universidad de Alcala de Henares

Date Written: December 1997

Abstract

The paper uses BHPS waves 1-5 (1991-5) to compare paid work participation rates of men and women. Year-on-year persistence in paid work propensities is high, but greater for men than women. Non-work persistence is higher for women. Using panel data probit regression models, the paper also investigates why men's and women's participation rates differ, comparing the roles of differences in observable characteristics and differences in rates of return to these characteristics, while also controlling for unobserved heterogeneity. Most of the difference in participation rates is accounted for by the differences in returns associated with the presence of children, especially young ones.

JEL Classification: J6, J21, J22

Suggested Citation

Booth, Alison L. and Jenkins, Stephen P. and García Serrano, Carlos, New Men and New Women?: A Comparison of Paid Work Propensities from a Panel Data Perspective (December 1997). CEPR Discussion Paper Series No. 1775, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=105208

Alison L. Booth

Australian National University (ANU) - Research School of Social Sciences (RSSS) ( email )

Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200
Australia
+61 2 6125 3285 (Phone)
+61 2 6125 0182 (Fax)

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

London
United Kingdom

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

Stephen P. Jenkins (Contact Author)

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - Department of Social Policy and Administration ( email )

Houghton Street
London, England WC2A 2AE
United Kingdom

Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

University of Essex - Institute for Social and Economic Research (ISER) ( email )

Wivenhoe Park
Colchester CO4 3SQ
United Kingdom
+44 120 687 3374 (Phone)
+44 120 687 3151 (Fax)

Carlos García Serrano

Universidad de Alcala de Henares ( email )

Plaza de San Diego s/n
E-28801 Madrid
Spain
+34 91 885 4263 (Phone)
+34 91 885 4239 (Fax)

Here is the Coronavirus
related research on SSRN

Paper statistics

Abstract Views
699
PlumX Metrics