Crisis, Charisma, and Consequences: Evidence from the 2004 U.S. Presidential Election

13 Pages Posted: 11 Dec 2007

See all articles by Jennifer L. Merolla

Jennifer L. Merolla

Claremont Colleges - Claremont Graduate University

Jennifer M. Ramos

University of California, Davis

Elizabeth J. Zechmeister

University of California, Davis

Abstract

We investigate how conditions of crisis affect perceptions of charisma and how these, in turn, affect blame attribution and self-sacrificial behavior. Our data are from a 2004 experimental study that preceded the U.S. presidential election, in which we manipulated concerns of a terrorist attack. The results show that those in the Crisis condition rated Bush higher on perceptions of charisma compared to those in the Good Times condition. The Crisis condition also directly and indirectly, via perceptions of charisma, affected whether Bush was blamed for failures in Iraq and our subjects' willingness to sacrifice their personal resources for his candidacy.

Suggested Citation

Merolla, Jennifer L. and Ramos, Jennifer M. and Zechmeister, Elizabeth J., Crisis, Charisma, and Consequences: Evidence from the 2004 U.S. Presidential Election. Journal of Politics, Vol. 69, No. 1, pp. 30-42, February 2007. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1065908 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2508.2007.00492.x

Jennifer L. Merolla (Contact Author)

Claremont Colleges - Claremont Graduate University ( email )

150 E. Tenth Street
Claremont, CA 91711
United States

Jennifer M. Ramos

University of California, Davis ( email )

One Shields Avenue
Davis, CA 95616
United States

Elizabeth J. Zechmeister

University of California, Davis ( email )

One Shields Avenue
Davis, CA 95616
United States

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