Unions, Voter Turnout, and Class Bias in the U.S. Electorate, 1964-2004

12 Pages Posted: 11 Dec 2007

See all articles by Jan E. Leighley

Jan E. Leighley

University of Arizona - Department of Political Science

Jonathan Nagler

NYU - Wilf Family Department of Politics

Abstract

This paper uses individual-level data to examine the impact of unions on turnout and assesses the consequences of dramatic changes in union strength and in the composition of union membership since 1964 for the composition of the U.S. electorate. We first estimate individual-level models to test for the distinct effects of union membership and union strength on the probabilities of members and nonmembers voting and then test whether the effect of individual union membership and overall union strength varies across income levels. We find that unions increase turnout of both members and nonmembers. By simulating what turnout would be were union membership at its 1964 level, we show that the decline in union membership since 1964 has affected the aggregate turnout of both low- and middle-income individuals more than the aggregate turnout of high-income individuals. However, while class bias has increased as a consequence of the decline, the change is surprisingly small.

Suggested Citation

Leighley, Jan E. and Nagler, Jonathan, Unions, Voter Turnout, and Class Bias in the U.S. Electorate, 1964-2004. Journal of Politics, Vol. 69, No. 2, pp. 430-441, May 2007. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1065957 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2508.2007.00541.x

Jan E. Leighley (Contact Author)

University of Arizona - Department of Political Science ( email )

315 Social Sciences Building
P.O. Box 210027
Tucson, AZ 85721-0027
United States
520-621-7600 (Phone)

Jonathan Nagler

NYU - Wilf Family Department of Politics ( email )

Dept of Politics - 2nd floor
19 W. 4th Street
New York, NY 10012
United States

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