Human Resource Management Policies and Productivity: New Evidence from an Econometric Case Study

Posted: 29 Feb 2008

See all articles by Derek C. Jones

Derek C. Jones

Hamilton College - Economics Department

Panu Kalmi

Aalto University - Department of Economics

Antti Kauhanen

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Date Written: 2006

Abstract

First we distinguish various approaches used by economists to assess the impact of human resource management practices on productivity and then we briefly review and illustrate studies that represent different approaches. In the main part of the paper we illustrate the econometric case study method, by using new data to analyse a case from retail trade and by emulating an approach used in an earlier study. Consistent with theory we find that when employees have opportunities to participate, and to receive appropriate information and pertinent rewards, a one standard deviation increase of the first principal component score would increase productivity by 1 per cent. Our findings imply that there are benefits to innovative work practices, even in settings where employees do simple tasks and employees are relatively low-skilled. Since our findings are similar to those contained in a previous study, our results also indicate the value of replication studies.

Suggested Citation

Jones, Derek C. and Kalmi, Panu and Kauhanen, Antti, Human Resource Management Policies and Productivity: New Evidence from an Econometric Case Study ( 2006). Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Vol. 22, Issue 4, pp. 526-538, 2006. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1096869 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grj031

Derek C. Jones (Contact Author)

Hamilton College - Economics Department ( email )

198 College Hill Road
Clinton, NY 13323
United States
315-859-4381 (Phone)
315-859-4477 (Fax)

Panu Kalmi

Aalto University - Department of Economics ( email )

PO Box 1210
FI-00101 Helsinki
Finland

Antti Kauhanen

affiliation not provided to SSRN

No Address Available

Here is the Coronavirus
related research on SSRN

Paper statistics

Abstract Views
672
PlumX Metrics