From Skills Revolution to Productivity Miracle-Not as Easy as it Sounds?

Posted: 29 Feb 2008

See all articles by Ewart J Keep

Ewart J Keep

Cardiff University - School of Social Sciences

Ken Mayhew

University of Oxford - Department of Economics

William Payne

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Date Written: 2006

Abstract

This article surveys the potential impact of skill on productivity. It opens with a review of the utility of productivity as a measure of systemic economic performance, and then goes on to explore the oft-assumed close and strong relationship between skills and productivity. The importance of other factors and types of investment is stressed. These complementary elements may be at least as important as skill in boosting performance, and their absence may negate the impact of public investment in education and training. The ability of economic development policy, particularly as it relates to the Regional Development Agencies, to address skills and economic development is assessed, and questions are raised about what type and level of skill might have the largest impact on economic performance. In conclusion, we discuss the demands that new policy approaches are making upon the machinery and personnel of government.

Suggested Citation

Keep, Ewart J and Mayhew, Ken and Payne, Jonathan Harold, From Skills Revolution to Productivity Miracle-Not as Easy as it Sounds? ( 2006). Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Vol. 22, Issue 4, pp. 539-559, 2006. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1096870 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxrep/grj032

Ewart J Keep (Contact Author)

Cardiff University - School of Social Sciences ( email )

The Glamorgan Building
King Edward VII Avenue
Cardiff, Wales CF10 3WT
United Kingdom

Ken Mayhew

University of Oxford - Department of Economics ( email )

Manor Road Building
Manor Road
Oxford, OX1 3BJ
United Kingdom

Jonathan Harold Payne

affiliation not provided to SSRN

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