Foreign Technology Transfer and Productivity: Evidence from a Matched Sample

Posted: 26 Feb 2008

See all articles by Mahmut Yasar

Mahmut Yasar

University of Texas at Arlington - Department of Economics; Emory University - Department of Economics

Catherine J. Morrison Paul

University of California, Davis - Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER); University of Hartford - Barney School of Business

Abstract

We examine the causal effects of alternative foreign technology transfer channels on the productivity of Turkish manufacturing plants, using propensity score matching techniques that limit implicit assumptions about plant homogeneity and self selection imbedded in standard estimates of such effects. We find positive impacts of technology transfer through foreign direct investment (FDI), exporting, and importing on both total factor and labor productivity, with FDI dominating and importing the least significant. Further, although internationally linked plants on average exhibit better productivity and differing characteristics than domestic plants before matching, the closeness of the matching indicates that remaining productivity gaps are caused by foreign technology transfer.

Keywords: casualty, exports, foreign direct investment, imports, plant performance

JEL Classification: F10, F14, D21, L60

Suggested Citation

Yasar, Mahmut and Morrison Paul, Catherine J., Foreign Technology Transfer and Productivity: Evidence from a Matched Sample. Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, Vol. 26, No. 1, pp. 105-112, January 2008, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1097408

Mahmut Yasar (Contact Author)

University of Texas at Arlington - Department of Economics ( email )

701 S. West Street
Arlington, TX 76019
United States

Emory University - Department of Economics ( email )

Catherine J. Morrison Paul

University of California, Davis - Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics ( email )

One Shields Avenue
Davis, CA 95616
United States
916-752-0469 (Phone)
916-752-5614 (Fax)

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

University of Hartford - Barney School of Business

200 Bloomfield Ave
West Hartford, CT 06117
United States

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Abstract Views
622
PlumX Metrics