R&D Models: Lessons from Vaccine History

60 Pages Posted: 5 Mar 2008 Last revised: 1 Jul 2014

See all articles by Paul Wilson

Paul Wilson

Columbia University - Department of Population and Family Health; Policy Analysis, International AIDS Vaccine Initiative

Sarah Post

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Smita Srinivas

Technological Change Lab, Columbia University

Date Written: June 1, 2007

Abstract

A preventive HIV vaccine offers the best hope for ending the AIDS pandemic. Scientific evidence suggests that an HIV vaccine is possible, and funding for HIV vaccine research and development (R&D) has increased substantially in recent years. The speed of progress toward an HIV vaccine will depend on the management of the effort as well as on its scale, however, and organizational issues have been the subject of vigorous debate. With this paper, we seek to shed light on these debates by examining the history of vaccine development, as well as some examples of large R&D initiatives in other areas. We focus on two issues: the roles of the public and private sectors, and the merits and risks of strong central direction of R&D. We also consider the scientific, regulatory, and institutional changes that complicate extrapolation from past experience to the case of HIV vaccines. Our analysis draws on extensive interviews with experts in the field as well as a literature review.

Keywords: HIV vaccine, research and development, public and private sector

JEL Classification: O19, O31, O32, H41, H42, H57

Suggested Citation

Wilson, Paul and Post, Sarah and Srinivas, Smita, R&D Models: Lessons from Vaccine History (June 1, 2007). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1099495 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1099495

Paul Wilson

Columbia University - Department of Population and Family Health ( email )

Columbia University
60 Haven Avenue #B2
New York, NY 10032
United States

Policy Analysis, International AIDS Vaccine Initiative ( email )

110 William Street, Floor 27
New York, NY 10038
United States

Sarah Post

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

Smita Srinivas (Contact Author)

Technological Change Lab, Columbia University ( email )

400 Avery, 1172 Amsterdam Avenue, MC 340
New York,, NY 10027
United States

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