Reinventing Policing Through the Prism of the Colonial Kiap

19 Pages Posted: 12 Sep 2008

See all articles by John Braithwaite

John Braithwaite

School of Regulation & Global Governance (RegNet)

Sinclair Dinnen

Australian National University (ANU)

Date Written: December 14, 2007

Abstract

Few institutions globalized more quickly to every nation on earth than the one Sir Robert Peel invented in 1829. The argument of this essay is that the transplantation involved has very often lacked contextual attunement to local conditions. Consequently, a great many nations have police that are promoters of tyranny, privilege and corruption rather than defenders of liberty. The particular argument of our contribution is that there has been excessive transplantation of urban policing models into societies where village life is more the norm. In this regard we suggest there is something to learn from pre-Peelian police in the first world and colonial policing in the third world.

Keywords: New Guinea, Colonialism, Police, Rural Crime

Suggested Citation

Braithwaite, John and Dinnen, Sinclair, Reinventing Policing Through the Prism of the Colonial Kiap (December 14, 2007). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1105227 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1105227

John Braithwaite (Contact Author)

School of Regulation & Global Governance (RegNet) ( email )

Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200
Australia

Sinclair Dinnen

Australian National University (ANU) ( email )

Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 2601
Australia

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