Cyber-Terrorism: Legal Principle and the Law in the United Kingdom

Posted: 20 Mar 2008

See all articles by Clive Walker

Clive Walker

University of Leeds - Centre for Criminal Justice Studies (CCJS)

Abstract

The paper consider whether there is a need to react to cyber-terrorism and if so, to what extent? The first step in the argument is to overlay a principled framework on any legal initiative. This task also requires a critical scrutiny of the definitions of cyber-terrorism. Moving from definitions to typologies, the variants of cyber-terrorism are examined and include both the ancillary and offensive. Categories include: Information Warfare; Communications; Personnel and Logistical Support; Intelligence Gathering; Propaganda. There is then consideration of the legal responses under the following headings: Hostile Cyber-Attack; Support Cyber-Activities. The foregoing survey suggests that there are few legal gaps and that the difficulties of prosecution are often evidential rather than substantive. Consideration is also given to infrastructure and institutional responses. There is finally the encouragement of engagement which should take place in cyberspace, since it has become one of the front lines in the fight against terrorism.

Keywords: terrorism, cyber-terrorism, special laws, emergency laws, security laws

JEL Classification: K14, K42, K40, K33

Suggested Citation

Walker, Clive, Cyber-Terrorism: Legal Principle and the Law in the United Kingdom. Penn State Law Review, Vol. 110, No. pp. 625-665, 2006. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1109113

Clive Walker (Contact Author)

University of Leeds - Centre for Criminal Justice Studies (CCJS) ( email )

Leeds LS2 9JT
United Kingdom
44 (0) 113 3435022 (Phone)
44 (0) 113 3435056 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://www.law.leeds.ac.uk/people/staff/walker/

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