Employing Active-Learning Techniques and Metacognition in Law School: Shifting Energy from Professor to Student

University of Detroit Mercy Law Review, Vol. 81, 2003

St. John's Legal Studies Research Paper No. 08-0125

29 Pages Posted: 2 Apr 2008

See all articles by Robin Boyle

Robin Boyle

St. John's University School of Law; St. John's University - School of Law

Abstract

What is metacognition and why have your students engage in it? Metacognition is an instructional tool that "shifts energy from professor to student." Researchers in fields of psychology and education have found metacognition to be an effective method to engage students in the learning process. Law students are diverse in their learning styles, according to assessments performed annually at St. John's University School of Law. Law professors are encouraged to engage students in active learning and metacognitive exercises. This article presents examples of teaching techniques involving active engagement and metacognition.

Suggested Citation

Boyle, Robin and Boyle, Robin, Employing Active-Learning Techniques and Metacognition in Law School: Shifting Energy from Professor to Student. University of Detroit Mercy Law Review, Vol. 81, 2003 , St. John's Legal Studies Research Paper No. 08-0125, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1114894

Robin Boyle (Contact Author)

St. John's University - School of Law ( email )

8000 Utopia Parkway
Jamaica, NY 11439
United States
718-990-6609 (Phone)

St. John's University School of Law ( email )

8000 Utopia Parkway
Jamaica, NY 11439
United States
718-990-6609 (Phone)

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