When Bias is Bipartisan: Teaching about the Democratic Process in an Intellectual Property Law Republic

19 Pages Posted: 3 Apr 2008

See all articles by Ann Bartow

Ann Bartow

Franklin Pierce Center for IP at UNH Law

Date Written: April 2008

Abstract

This essay asserts that intellectual property law courses offer law professors the opportunity to teach subject areas rich with complicated statutory and court-made doctrines about which students do not usually have strong or extensively delineated moral views, giving everyone in the classroom a refreshing break from the traditional partisanship of political party politics. It explains that the politics of intellectual property law are somewhat insulated from traditional political party divisions, and as a result, learning copyright law, patent law and trademark law can give students the opportunity to think through complex issues with few concerns about political bias, leading to more open minded grappling with contextual issues of fairness, rights balancing, and social welfare than may be possible with other controversial legal topics.

Keywords: copyrights, patents, trademarks, law, teaching, pedagogy, social justice, intellectual property

JEL Classification: K1

Suggested Citation

Bartow, Ann, When Bias is Bipartisan: Teaching about the Democratic Process in an Intellectual Property Law Republic (April 2008). St. Louis University Law Journal, Vol. 52, No. 1, 2008. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1115353

Ann Bartow (Contact Author)

Franklin Pierce Center for IP at UNH Law ( email )

Two White Street
Concord, NH 03301
United States

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