Lessons from Iraq and Bosnia on the Theory and Practice of No-Fly Zones

Journal of Strategic Studies, Vol. 27, No. 3, pp. 454-478, September 2004

25 Pages Posted: 4 Apr 2008  

Alexander Benard

Stanford Law School; Gryphon Partners

Abstract

In the 1990s no-fly zones were introduced as a new way to utilize airpower in the context of Peace Support Operations (PSOs). During that time, they were put to use over Iraq and over Bosnia. However, it is unclear to what extent the no-fly zones were successful in those two instances. This article examines the capabilities of no-fly zones and analyzes the Iraq and Bosnia cases of enforcement. It concludes that no-fly zones can be very effective if properly implemented and offers guidance for policy-makers on how to achieve maximum efficacy.

Keywords: Iraq, Bosnia, no-fly zones, peace-keeping, peace support operations

Suggested Citation

Benard, Alexander, Lessons from Iraq and Bosnia on the Theory and Practice of No-Fly Zones. Journal of Strategic Studies, Vol. 27, No. 3, pp. 454-478, September 2004. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1116005

Alexander Benard (Contact Author)

Stanford Law School ( email )

559 Nathan Abbott Way
Stanford, CA 94305-8610
United States

Gryphon Partners ( email )

1001 Pennsylvania Ave
Washington, DC 20004
United States

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