James Madison and the Bill of Rights: A Reluctant Paternity

48 Pages Posted: 16 Apr 2008

See all articles by Paul Finkelman

Paul Finkelman

Gratz College; Albany Law School

Abstract

In 1789, James Madison, despite opposition from former federalist allies, introduced a series of twelve constitutional amendments to the newly formed Congress, ten of which were ratified in 1791; earning him the title `father of the Bill of Rights.' This article explores the route Madison's reluctant support of the amendments and the political realities that forced him to take his well-earned place in the history of liberty.

Keywords: James Madison, amendments, Congress

Suggested Citation

Finkelman, Paul, James Madison and the Bill of Rights: A Reluctant Paternity. Supreme Court Review, Vol. 9, No. 301, 1990. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1120299

Paul Finkelman (Contact Author)

Gratz College ( email )

7605 Old York Road
Melrose Park, PA 19027
United States

Albany Law School

NY
United States

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