Does Education Improve Health? A Reexamination of the Evidence from Compulsory Schooling Laws

15 Pages Posted: 19 May 2008

Abstract

This article analyzes the impact of compulsory schooling laws early in the twentieth century on long-term health. The author finds no compelling evidence for a causal link between education and health using this research design. Further, the results suggest that only a small fraction of health conditions are affected by education, and several of those are conditions, such as sight and hearing, where economic theories don't appear to be relevant.

Keywords: education, mortality, health, compulsory schooling, Health Production: Nutrition, Mortality, Morbidity, Substance Abuse and Addiction, Disability, and Economic Behavior, Demographic Trends and Forecasts, Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Income

Suggested Citation

Mazumder, Bhashkar, Does Education Improve Health? A Reexamination of the Evidence from Compulsory Schooling Laws. Economic Perspectives, Vol. 32, No. 2, 2008. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1134064

Bhashkar Mazumder (Contact Author)

Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago ( email )

230 South LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL 60604
United States

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