The Impact of State Physical Education Requirements on Youth Physical Activity and Overweight

Health Economics, Vol. 16, No. 12, pp. 1287-1301, 2007

Posted: 31 May 2008

See all articles by John Cawley

John Cawley

Cornell University - College of Human Ecology, Department of Policy Analysis & Management (PAM); Cornell University - College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Economics; Erasmus University Rotterdam (EUR) - Erasmus School of Economics (ESE); National University of Ireland, Galway (NUIG) - J.E. Cairnes School of Business & Economics; NBER; IZA

Chad D. Meyerhoefer

Lehigh University

David Locke Newhouse

World Bank

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Abstract

To combat childhood overweight in the U.S., which has risen dramatically in the past three decades, many medical and public health organizations have called for students to spend more time in physical education (PE) classes. This paper is the first to examine the impact of state PE requirements on student physical activity and overweight. It also exploits variation in state laws as quasi-natural experiments in order to estimate the causal impact of PE on student activity and weight. We study nationwide data from the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System for 1999, 2001, and 2003 merged with data on state minimum PE requirements from the 2001 Shape of the Nation Report. We find that high school students with a binding PE requirement report an average of 31 additional minutes spent physically active in PE class. Our results also indicate that additional PE time raises the number of days per week that girls report having exercised vigorously or having engaged in strength-building activity. We find no evidence that PE lowers BMI or the probability that a student is overweight. We conclude that raising PE credit requirements may make girls more physically active overall but that there is not yet the scientific base to declare raising PE requirements an anti-obesity initiative for either boys or girls.

Keywords: obesity, physical activity, education, instrumental variables

JEL Classification: I18, I28

Suggested Citation

Cawley, John and Meyerhoefer, Chad D. and Newhouse, David Locke, The Impact of State Physical Education Requirements on Youth Physical Activity and Overweight. Health Economics, Vol. 16, No. 12, pp. 1287-1301, 2007, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1139039

John Cawley (Contact Author)

Cornell University - College of Human Ecology, Department of Policy Analysis & Management (PAM) ( email )

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Cornell University - College of Arts & Sciences, Department of Economics ( email )

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Chad D. Meyerhoefer

Lehigh University ( email )

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HOME PAGE: http://www3.lehigh.edu/business/faculty/meyerhoefer.asp

David Locke Newhouse

World Bank ( email )

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