Comparative Judicial Politics

28 Pages Posted: 1 Jul 2008

See all articles by John A. Ferejohn

John A. Ferejohn

NYU Law School

Frances McCall Rosenbluth

Yale University - Department of Political Science

Charles R. Shipan

University of Michigan at Ann Arbor - Department of Political Science

Date Written: October 2004

Abstract

It is hard to think of a political system that does not trumpet its commitment to "the rule of law," based on the principle that citizens are better off when the political system establishes rules for all to follow, rather than subjecting citizens either to arbitrary rule or to anarchy1. By entrusting the interpretation and enforcement of laws to legal specialists, the government agrees to abide by its own laws, and the courts can rule against the government to uphold the "laws of the land." Governments in most political systems are at least rhetorically deferential to this concept.

Suggested Citation

Ferejohn, John A. and Rosenbluth, Frances McCall and Shipan, Charles R., Comparative Judicial Politics (October 2004). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1154123 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1154123

John A. Ferejohn

NYU Law School ( email )

40 Washington Square South
New York, NY 10012-1099
United States
2129986029 (Phone)

Frances McCall Rosenbluth (Contact Author)

Yale University - Department of Political Science ( email )

Box 208269
New Haven, DC 06520-8269
United States
203-432-5256 (Phone)

Charles R. Shipan

University of Michigan at Ann Arbor - Department of Political Science ( email )

500 S. State Street
Ann Arbor, MI 48109
United States
734-615-9140 (Phone)

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