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Why Rising Tides Dont Lift All Boats? An Explanation of the Relationship between Poverty and Unemployment in Britain

49 Pages Posted: 14 Jul 2008  

Karen Gardiner

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Carol Propper

University of Bristol - Leverhulme Centre for Market and Public Organisation (CMPO); University of Bristol - Department of Economics; Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

Date Written: February 2001

Abstract

Abstract: This paper is motivated by the lack of any obvious relationship between aggregate poverty and unemployment in Great Britain. We derive a framework based on individuals' risks of unemployment and poverty, and how these vary over the economic cycle. Analysing the British Household Panel Survey for 1991-96, we are able to square the micro evidence - that unemployment matters for poverty - with the macro picture - that there's no strong link. We then go on to identify which household and individual characteristics are associated with whether an individual's poverty risk is vulnerable to the economic cycle.

Suggested Citation

Gardiner, Karen and Propper, Carol, Why Rising Tides Dont Lift All Boats? An Explanation of the Relationship between Poverty and Unemployment in Britain (February 2001). LSE STICERD Research Paper No. CASE046. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1158937

Karen Gardiner

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Carol Propper

University of Bristol - Leverhulme Centre for Market and Public Organisation (CMPO) ( email )

12 Priory Road
Bristol BS8 1TN
United Kingdom

HOME PAGE: http://www.bris.ac.uk/Depts/Economics/department/profiles/propper.htm

University of Bristol - Department of Economics ( email )

8 Woodland Road
Bristol BS8 ITN
United Kingdom
+44 117 928 8427 (Phone)
+44 117 954 6997 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://www.bris.ac.uk/Depts/Economics/department/profiles/propper.htm

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

77 Bastwick Street
London, EC1V 3PZ
United Kingdom

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