IS Knowledge and Skills Sought by Employers: A Content Analysis of Australian IS Early Career Online Job Advertisements

Australasian Journal of Information Systems, Vol. 15, No. 2, 2008

22 Pages Posted: 29 Jul 2008  

Mary Anne Kennan

Charles Sturt University - Sydney; Information Systems, Technology and Management, Australian School of Business, University of New South Wales

Patricia Willard

Information Systems, Technology and Management, Australian School of Business, University of New South Wales

Dubravka Cecez-Kecmanovic

Information Systems, Technology and Management, Australian School of Business, University of New South Wales

Concepción S. Wilson

Information Systems, Technology and Management, Australian School of Business, University of New South Wales

Date Written: July, 22 2008

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to develop an understanding of the knowledge, skills and competencies demanded of early career information systems (IS) graduates in Australia. Online job advertisements from 2006 were collected and investigated using content analysis software to determine the frequencies and patterns of occurrence of specific requirements. This analysis reveals a dominant cluster of core IS knowledge and competency skills that revolves around IS Development as the most frequently required category of knowledge (78% of ads) and is strongly associated with: Business Analysis, Systems Analysis; Management; Operations, Maintenance & Support; Communication Skills; Personal Characteristics; Computer Languages; Data & Information Management; Internet, Intranet, Web Applications; and Software Packages. Identification of the core cluster of IS knowledge and skills - in demand across a wide variety of jobs - is important to better understand employers' needs for and expectations from IS graduates and the implications for education programs. Much less prevalent is the second cluster that includes knowledge and skills at a more technical side of IS (Architecture and Infrastructure, Operating Systems, Networks, and Security). Issues raised include the nature of entry level positions and their role in the preparation of their incumbents for future more senior positions. The findings add an Australian perspective to the literature on information systems job ads and should be of value to educators, employers, as well as current and future IS professionals.

Keywords: IS Careers, IS Knowledge and skills, IS Job Advertisements, Content Analysis

Suggested Citation

Kennan, Mary Anne and Willard, Patricia and Cecez-Kecmanovic, Dubravka and Wilson, Concepción S., IS Knowledge and Skills Sought by Employers: A Content Analysis of Australian IS Early Career Online Job Advertisements (July, 22 2008). Australasian Journal of Information Systems, Vol. 15, No. 2, 2008. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1168044

Mary Anne Kennan (Contact Author)

Charles Sturt University - Sydney ( email )

Locked Bag 450
Silverwater, NSW 2128
Australia

HOME PAGE: http://www.csu.edu.au/faculty/educat/sis/staff/kennan.htm

Information Systems, Technology and Management, Australian School of Business, University of New South Wales ( email )

Information Systems, Technology and Management
Australian School of Business
Sydney, NSW 2052
Australia

HOME PAGE: http://www2.sistm.unsw.edu.au/nps/servlet/portalservice?GI_ID=System.LoggedOutInheritableArea&maxWnd

Patricia Willard

Information Systems, Technology and Management, Australian School of Business, University of New South Wales ( email )

Australian School of Business
University of New South Wales
Sydney, New South Wales 2052
Australia

Dubravka Cecez-Kecmanovic

Information Systems, Technology and Management, Australian School of Business, University of New South Wales ( email )

Information Systems, Technology and Management
Australian School of Business,
Sydney, NSW 2052
Australia

HOME PAGE: http://www2.sistm.unsw.edu.au/nps/servlet/portalservice?GI_ID=System.LoggedOutInheritableArea&maxWnd

Concepción S. Wilson

Information Systems, Technology and Management, Australian School of Business, University of New South Wales ( email )

Australian School of Business
University of New South Wales
Sydney, New South Wales 2052
Australia

HOME PAGE: http://www.sistm.unsw.edu.au/nps/servlet/portalservice?GI_ID=System.LoggedOutInheritableArea&maxWnd=

Paper statistics

Downloads
270
Rank
91,271
Abstract Views
1,418