Information, Avoidance Behavior, and Health: the Effect of Ozone on Asthma Hospitalizations

45 Pages Posted: 4 Aug 2008 Last revised: 12 Apr 2012

See all articles by Matthew Neidell

Matthew Neidell

Columbia University; University of Chicago - Department of Economics and CISES; PERC - Property and Environment Research Center

Date Written: July 2008

Abstract

This paper assesses whether responses to information about risk impact estimates of the relationship between ozone and asthma in Southern California. Using a regression discontinuity design, I find smog alerts significantly reduces daily attendance at two major outdoor facilities. Using daily time-series regression models that include year-month and small area fixed effects, I find estimates of the effect of ozone for children and the elderly that include information are significantly larger than estimates that do not. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that individuals take substantial action to reduce exposure to risk; estimates ignoring these actions are severely biased.

Suggested Citation

Neidell, Matthew, Information, Avoidance Behavior, and Health: the Effect of Ozone on Asthma Hospitalizations (July 2008). NBER Working Paper No. w14209. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1190358

Matthew Neidell (Contact Author)

Columbia University ( email )

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University of Chicago - Department of Economics and CISES ( email )

1126 East 59th Street
Chicago, IL 60637
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PERC - Property and Environment Research Center

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