Bank Capital and Portfolio Management: the 1930's Capital Crunch and Scramble to Shed Risk

52 Pages Posted: 4 Sep 1998 Last revised: 10 Oct 2010

See all articles by Charles W. Calomiris

Charles W. Calomiris

Columbia University - Columbia Business School; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Berry K. Wilson

Pace University - Department of Finance and Economics

Date Written: July 1998

Abstract

Recent models of banking under asymmetric information argue that depositors penalize banks that offer high-risk deposits. Focusing on New York City banks in the 1920's and 1930's, this study examines how banks manage risk during normal times and in response to severe shocks. We develop and apply a simple framework that identifies the tradeoffs among alternative means of satisfying depositors' preferences for low-risk deposits (i.e. low asset risk versus high capital). During the 1920's profitable lending opportunities and low costs of raising capital prompted banks to increase their asset risk, while increasing capital to maintain low default risks on deposits. Cross-sectional differences in the cost of raising equity explain differences in banks' choices of asset risk and capital ratios. In the wake of the loan losses produced by the Depression, high default risk was penalized with deposit withdrawals. To reduce deposit risk, banks increased their riskless assets and cut dividends, but avoided costly equity issues. Banks with high default risk or with high costs of raising equity contracted dividends the most during the 1930's.

Suggested Citation

Calomiris, Charles W. and Wilson, Berry K., Bank Capital and Portfolio Management: the 1930's Capital Crunch and Scramble to Shed Risk (July 1998). NBER Working Paper No. w6649. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=119888

Charles W. Calomiris (Contact Author)

Columbia University - Columbia Business School ( email )

3022 Broadway
601 Uris, Dept. of Finance & Economics
New York, NY 10027
United States
212-854-8748 (Phone)
212-316-9219 (Fax)

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Berry K. Wilson

Pace University - Department of Finance and Economics ( email )

Lubin School of Business
New York, NY 10038
United States

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