The Greenness of Cities: Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Urban Development

46 Pages Posted: 6 Aug 2008

See all articles by Edward L. Glaeser

Edward L. Glaeser

Harvard University - Department of Economics; Brookings Institution; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Matthew E. Kahn

University of Southern California; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: August 2008

Abstract

Carbon dioxide emissions may create significant social harm because of global warming, yet American urban development tends to be in low density areas with very hot summers. In this paper, we attempt to quantify the carbon dioxide emissions associated with new construction in different locations across the country. We look at emissions from driving, public transit, home heating, and household electricity usage. We find that the lowest emissions areas are generally in California and that the highest emissions areas are in Texas and Oklahoma. There is a strong negative association between emissions and land use regulations. By restricting new development, the cleanest areas of the country would seem to be pushing new development towards places with higher emissions. Cities generally have significantly lower emissions than suburban areas, and the city-suburb gap is particularly large in older areas, like New York.

Suggested Citation

Glaeser, Edward L. and Kahn, Matthew E., The Greenness of Cities: Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Urban Development (August 2008). Harvard Institute of Economic Research Discussion Paper No. 2161. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1204716 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1204716

Edward L. Glaeser (Contact Author)

Harvard University - Department of Economics ( email )

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Matthew E. Kahn

University of Southern California ( email )

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National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

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