Download this Paper Open PDF in Browser

Michelle Obama: Intersectionality, Implicit Bias, and Third-Party Associative Discrimination in the 2008 Election

57 Pages Posted: 22 Aug 2008 Last revised: 1 Aug 2017

Quinetta Roberson

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Gregory Scott Parks

Wake Forest University - School of Law

Date Written: August 22, 2008

Abstract

Elections are like hiring decisions, and new frontiers in employment discrimination law place Michelle Obama in context within the current presidential campaign. First, racism and sexism still exist within politics and employment. Within both domains, the intersection of these biases uniquely impact Black women, even Ms. Obama. Second, most race and gender bias is no longer express, but unconscious. And they influence voting and hiring/promotion behavior. Thus, there are instances in the 2008 campaign where these attitudes towards Ms. Obama have been demonstrated. Such instances are similar to fact-patterns in employment discrimination cases. Third, under Title VII, employment discrimination may be directed at a third party for their associations with members of a disliked group. Here, voters' unconscious biases against Mrs. Obama likely impact their voting decisions in regards to Senator Obama.

Keywords: Implicit Bias, Employment Discrimination, 2008 Campaign, Intersectionality, Michelle Obama

Suggested Citation

Roberson, Quinetta and Parks, Gregory Scott, Michelle Obama: Intersectionality, Implicit Bias, and Third-Party Associative Discrimination in the 2008 Election (August 22, 2008). Florida State University Law Review, 2010. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1248302 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1248302

Quinetta Roberson

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

Gregory Parks (Contact Author)

Wake Forest University - School of Law ( email )

P.O. Box 7206
Winston-Salem, NC 27109
United States
3367582170 (Phone)

Paper statistics

Downloads
329
Rank
76,882
Abstract Views
2,365