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Why are U.S. Lawyers Not Learning from Comparative Law?

THE INTERNATIONAL PRACTICE OF LAW: LIBER AMICORUM FOR THOMAS BÄR AND ROBERT KARRER, Nedin Peter Vogt, et al., eds., pp. 213-236, Basel and Frankfurt: Helbing & Lichtenhahn, and The Hague, London & Boston: Kluwer Law International, 1997

30 Pages Posted: 24 Aug 2008 Last revised: 11 Dec 2012

James R. Maxeiner

University of Baltimore - School of Law

Date Written: September 1, 1997

Abstract

Address the problem of comparative law in the United States. Explains why comparative law matters. Gives reasons why U.S. lawyers are not learning from comparative law. These include lack of skills, lack of institutional supports, and legal structures that resist comparative law. and an attitude that comparative law has little to teach.

Keywords: Comparative Law, Legal Education, Legal Methods

Suggested Citation

Maxeiner, James R., Why are U.S. Lawyers Not Learning from Comparative Law? (September 1, 1997). THE INTERNATIONAL PRACTICE OF LAW: LIBER AMICORUM FOR THOMAS BÄR AND ROBERT KARRER, Nedin Peter Vogt, et al., eds., pp. 213-236, Basel and Frankfurt: Helbing & Lichtenhahn, and The Hague, London & Boston: Kluwer Law International, 1997. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1250002

James Maxeiner (Contact Author)

University of Baltimore - School of Law ( email )

1420 N. Charles Street
Baltimore, MD 21218
United States
410-837-4628 (Phone)

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