How do African Populations Perceive Corruption: Microeconomic Evidence from Afrobarometer Data in Twelve Countries

23 Pages Posted: 29 Aug 2008 Last revised: 1 Oct 2008

See all articles by Joseph Attila

Joseph Attila

RimeLab, Université Nord de France, Université d'Artois

Date Written: July 1, 2008

Abstract

In this paper, we examine the microeconomic determinants of the perception of corruption in twelve Sub-Saharan African countries. Unlike the indicators of corruption based on the opinion of international experts, the study focuses on corrupt practices as experienced by the African people themselves. The results of our estimates, using an ordered probit indicate that the individual characteristics such as age and sex significantly affect the perception people have of corruption as do social and political factors like access to information (press, media, radio). However, neither democracy nor participation in demonstrations, seem to affect the attitude of individuals towards corruption.

Keywords: Corruption, Sub-Saharan Africa, Ordered Probit

JEL Classification: H11, O12

Suggested Citation

Attila, Joseph Gbewopo, How do African Populations Perceive Corruption: Microeconomic Evidence from Afrobarometer Data in Twelve Countries (July 1, 2008). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1260828 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1260828

Joseph Gbewopo Attila (Contact Author)

RimeLab, Université Nord de France, Université d'Artois ( email )

Université d'Artois
EGASS
Arras, 62000
France
+33321603867 (Phone)

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