Fencing Off the Eagle and the Condor, Border Politics, and Indigenous Peoples

ABA Section of Environment, Energy and Resources: Natural Resources & Environment, Vol. 23, No. 2, p. 33, Fall 2008

3 Pages Posted: 15 Sep 2008  

Angelique EagleWoman

Mitchell Hamline School of Law

Date Written: September 11, 2008

Abstract

The symbol for North American indigenous peoples has been the eagle, while the condor has stood for those from Central and South America. In the reclaiming of tribal sovereignty since the 1970s, the indigenous peoples of the Western Hemisphere have reunited to strengthen their relations. This has been especially significant in light of the recent plans of the U.S. to build a border wall along the southern border with Mexico. The UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (2007) provides that countries consult and cooperate with indigenous peoples to maintain the right to continue relations with their own members as well as with other indigenous peoples across borders.

Keywords: Indigenous, Tribal Nations, Border, U.S., Mexico, International Issues

Suggested Citation

EagleWoman, Angelique, Fencing Off the Eagle and the Condor, Border Politics, and Indigenous Peoples (September 11, 2008). ABA Section of Environment, Energy and Resources: Natural Resources & Environment, Vol. 23, No. 2, p. 33, Fall 2008. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1266866

Angelique EagleWoman (Contact Author)

Mitchell Hamline School of Law ( email )

875 Summit Ave
St. Paul, MN 55105-3076
United States

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