The Effect of Gun Shows on Gun-Related Deaths: Evidence from California and Texas

53 Pages Posted: 8 Oct 2008

See all articles by Mark Duggan

Mark Duggan

University of Maryland - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Randi Hjalmarsson

University of Maryland - School of Public Policy

Brian Jacob

Harvard University - Harvard Kennedy School (HKS); National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Date Written: October 2008

Abstract

Thousands of gun shows take place in the U.S. each year. Gun control advocates argue that because sales at gun shows are much less regulated than other sales, such shows make it easier for potential criminals to obtain a gun. Similarly, one might be concerned that gun shows would exacerbate suicide rates by providing individuals considering suicide with a more lethal means of ending their lives. On the other hand, proponents argue that gun shows are innocuous since potential criminals can acquire guns quite easily through other black market sales or theft. In this paper, we use data from Gun and Knife Show Calendar combined with vital statistics data to examine the effect of gun shows. We find no evidence that gun shows lead to substantial increases in either gun homicides or suicides. In addition, tighter regulation of gun shows does not appear to reduce the number of firearms-related deaths.

Suggested Citation

Duggan, Mark G. and Hjalmarsson, Randi and Jacob, Brian, The Effect of Gun Shows on Gun-Related Deaths: Evidence from California and Texas (October 2008). NBER Working Paper No. w14371. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1278446

Mark G. Duggan (Contact Author)

University of Maryland - Department of Economics ( email )

3115C Tydings Hall
College Park, MD 20742
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Randi Hjalmarsson

University of Maryland - School of Public Policy ( email )

College Park
College Park, MD 20742
United States

Brian Jacob

Harvard University - Harvard Kennedy School (HKS) ( email )

79 John F. Kennedy Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
617-384-7968 (Phone)
617-496-5747 (Fax)

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

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