Cebu Pacific Air (a)

8 Pages Posted: 21 Oct 2008

See all articles by James G. Clawson

James G. Clawson

University of Virginia - Darden School of Business

Gerry Yemen

University of Virginia - Darden School of Business

Marie-Grace Ngo

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Abstract

On February 2, 1998, Lance Gokongwei, the 31-year old chief executive officer of Cebu Pacific Air (Cebu), learned that Flight 5J-387 from Manila to Cagayan de Oro failed to arrive at its destination on schedule and was believed to be missing. The airline was barely three years old and just beginning to gain significant market presence in the Philippine domestic airline industry. The (A) case describes the information Gokongwei had at the time. The subsequent cases (labeled (B), (C), and (D), UVA-OB-0769, UVA-0B-0670, and UVA-OB671, respectively) describe the events that followed the tragic demise of Flight 5J-387. Cebu Pacific's transparency with the media, full cooperation with the government inquiry, assistance to victims' families at a personal level, and readiness to face up to its obligations gained the sympathy and trust of the public. At one point the government grounded the airline, citing safety concerns. Statements were published in national newspapers that expressed confidence in the airworthiness of Cebu Pacific, and disapproval for the airline's suspension. More importantly, the CEO, Lance Gokongwei, received encouragement and support from his employees through their volunteer efforts during the disaster and letters of support, while hundreds took unpaid leaves. This case provides an international dimension to the study of leadership. The material presents an opportunity to challenge students to consider leadership issues and present recommendations within the context of a cultural and economic environment different from the United States.

Excerpt

UVA-OB-0768

CEBU PACIFIC AIR (A)

February 2, 1998, was another busy morning for Lance Gokongwei, the 31-year-old chief executive officer (CEO) of Cebu Pacific Air (Cebu). Seated at the board-room table, Gokongwei was about to start his regular operations' meeting with the food business division when the telephone rang. On the other end was the operations head of Cebu Pacific, Diego Garrido, with disturbing news. Flight 5J-387 from Manila to Cagayan de Oro failed to arrive at its destination on schedule and was believed to be missing. Filled with disbelief, Gokongwei abruptly ended his meeting and proceeded to the Cebu offices in Mandaluyong. While he hoped that there had been a mistake in the information, the first question that filled the young CEO's mind was, “Could this be true?”

Gokongwei's crew members' and passengers' safety was his greatest concern. The airline was barely three years old and just beginning to gain significant market presence in the Philippine domestic airline industry. If the speculations of a plane crash were indeed true, how would this affect the company and its employees? Was the airline negligent, and therefore was he, as CEO, personally responsible for the accident?

. . .

Keywords: crisis communication, human resources, management of, leadership, management development

Suggested Citation

Clawson, James G. and Yemen, Gerry and Ngo, Marie-Grace, Cebu Pacific Air (a). Darden Case No. UVA-OB-0768. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1281826

James G. Clawson (Contact Author)

University of Virginia - Darden School of Business ( email )

P.O. Box 6550
Charlottesville, VA 22906-6550
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www.darden.virginia.edu/faculty/clawson.htm

Gerry Yemen

University of Virginia - Darden School of Business ( email )

P.O. Box 6550
Charlottesville, VA 22906-6550
United States

Marie-Grace Ngo

affiliation not provided to SSRN

No Address Available

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