The Impact of Medicare Part D on Medicare-Medicaid Dual-Eligible Beneficiaries' Prescription Utilization and Expenditures

29 Pages Posted: 23 Oct 2008

See all articles by Anirban Basu

Anirban Basu

University of Chicago - Department of Medicine

Wesley Yin

University of Chicago - Harris School of Public Policy; University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) - School of Public Policy & Social Research

G. Alexander

Johns Hopkins University - Department of Environmental Health Sciences and Epidemiology; Johns Hopkins University - Department of Medicine; Monument Analytics

Date Written: October 2008

Abstract

Features of Part D gave rise to broad concern that the drug benefit would negatively impact prescription utilization among the six million dual eligible beneficiaries, either during the transition from state Medicaid to Part D coverage, or in the long-run. At the same time, Part D contained other features, such as its auto-enrollment and premium subsidization policies, which were designed to safeguard utilization for this vulnerable group. Using national retail pharmacy claims, we examine the experience of dual eligibles during the first 18 months of Part D. We find no evidence that Part D adversely affected pharmaceutical utilization or out-of-pocket expenditures in the transition period, or in the 18 months subsequent to Part D implementation.

Suggested Citation

Basu, Anirban and Yin, Wesley and Alexander, G. Caleb, The Impact of Medicare Part D on Medicare-Medicaid Dual-Eligible Beneficiaries' Prescription Utilization and Expenditures (October 2008). NBER Working Paper No. w14413. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1288412

Anirban Basu (Contact Author)

University of Chicago - Department of Medicine ( email )

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HOME PAGE: http://home.uchicago.edu/~abasu

Wesley Yin

University of Chicago - Harris School of Public Policy ( email )

1155 East 60th Street
Chicago, IL 60637
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773-702-8194 (Phone)
773-702-2286 (Fax)

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) - School of Public Policy & Social Research ( email )

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Los Angeles, CA 90095
United States

G. Caleb Alexander

Johns Hopkins University - Department of Environmental Health Sciences and Epidemiology ( email )

Baltimore, MD 21205
United States

Johns Hopkins University - Department of Medicine ( email )

720 Rutland Avenue
Baltimore, MD 21205-2196
United States

Monument Analytics ( email )

Baltimore, MD
United States

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