Information Immobility and the Home Bias Puzzle

34 Pages Posted: 3 Nov 2008

See all articles by Stijn Van Nieuwerburgh

Stijn Van Nieuwerburgh

Columbia University Graduate School of Business; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER); Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

Laura Veldkamp

Columbia University - Columbia Business School; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Multiple version iconThere are 5 versions of this paper

Date Written: November 2007

Abstract

Many papers have argued that home bias arises because home investors can predict pays off their home assets more accurately than foreigners can. But why does this information advantage exist in a world where investors can learn foreign information? We model investors who are endowed with a small home information advantage. They can choose what information to learn before they invest in many risky assets. Surprisingly, even when home investors can learn what foreigners know, they choose not to. The reason is that investors profit more from knowing information that others do not know. Allowing investors to learn amplifies their initial information asymmetry. The model explains local and industry bias as well as observed patterns of foreign investments, portfolio out-performance and asset prices. Finally, we outline new avenues for empirical research.

Keywords: Home bias, asymmetric information, learning

Suggested Citation

Van Nieuwerburgh, Stijn and Veldkamp, Laura, Information Immobility and the Home Bias Puzzle (November 2007). NYU Working Paper No. FIN-07-017, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1293591

Stijn Van Nieuwerburgh (Contact Author)

Columbia University Graduate School of Business ( email )

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HOME PAGE: http://https://www0.gsb.columbia.edu/faculty/svannieuwerburgh/

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

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Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

London
United Kingdom

Laura Veldkamp

Columbia University - Columbia Business School ( email )

3022 Broadway
New York, NY 10027
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

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