Natural Kinds in Evolution and Systematics: Metaphysical and Epistemological Considerations

Acta Biotheoretica, Vol. 57, pp. 77-97, 2009

34 Pages Posted: 3 Nov 2008 Last revised: 22 Jun 2009

Ingo Brigandt

University of Alberta - Department of Philosophy

Date Written: August 8, 2008

Abstract

Despite the traditional focus on metaphysical issues in discussions of natural kinds in biology, epistemological considerations are at least as important. By revisiting the debate as to whether taxa are kinds or individuals, I argue that both accounts are metaphysically compatible but one or the other approach can be pragmatically preferable depending on the epistemic context. Recent objections against construing species as homeostatic property cluster kinds are also addressed. The second part of the paper broadens the perspective by considering homologues as another example of natural kinds, comparing them with analogues as functionally defined kinds. Given that there are various types of natural kinds, I discuss the different theoretical purposes served by diverse kind concepts, suggesting that there is no clear-cut distinction between natural kinds and other kinds, such as functional kinds. Rather than attempting to offer a unique metaphysical account of 'natural' kind, a more fruitful approach consists in the epistemological study of how different natural kind concepts are employed in scientific reasoning.

Keywords: natural kinds, species, taxa, homologues, analogues, induction, explanation

Suggested Citation

Brigandt, Ingo, Natural Kinds in Evolution and Systematics: Metaphysical and Epistemological Considerations (August 8, 2008). Acta Biotheoretica, Vol. 57, pp. 77-97, 2009. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1294094

Ingo Brigandt (Contact Author)

University of Alberta - Department of Philosophy ( email )

2-40 Assiniboia Hall
University of Alberta
Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E7
Canada

HOME PAGE: http://www.ualberta.ca/~brigandt

Paper statistics

Downloads
117
Rank
195,310
Abstract Views
734