Abstract

https://ssrn.com/abstract=1298493
 
 

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The Self-Reinforcing Nature of Social Hierarchy: Origins and Consequences of Power and Status


Joseph C. Magee


New York University (NYU) - Leonard N. Stern School of Business; New York University (NYU) - Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service

Adam D. Galinsky


Columbia Business School - Management

November 9, 2008

IACM 21st Annual Conference Paper

Abstract:     
Hierarchy is such a defining feature of organizations that its forms and basic functions are often taken for granted in organizational research. In this chapter, we revisit some basic sociological and psychological elements of hierarchy to explain why hierarchy is so pervasive across groups and organizations. We argue that status and power are two distinct and important bases of hierarchical differentiation, and we integrate a number of different literatures to explain why status and power hierarchies tend to be self-reinforcing. Power, related to one's control over valued resources, transforms individuals psychologically such that they think and act in ways that lead to the acquisition and retention of power. Status, related to the respect one has in the eyes of others, generates expectations for behavior that favor those with a prior status advantage.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 37


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Date posted: November 11, 2008  

Suggested Citation

Magee, Joseph C. and Galinsky, Adam D., The Self-Reinforcing Nature of Social Hierarchy: Origins and Consequences of Power and Status (November 9, 2008). IACM 21st Annual Conference Paper. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1298493 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1298493

Contact Information

Joseph Carl Magee (Contact Author)
New York University (NYU) - Leonard N. Stern School of Business ( email )
44 West 4th Street
New York, NY NY 10012
United States

New York University (NYU) - Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service
The Puck Building
295 Lafayette Street, Second Floor
New York, NY 10012
United States

Adam D. Galinsky
Columbia Business School - Management ( email )
3022 Broadway
New York, NY 10027
United States
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