Entangling Alliances: Nato's Security Policy and the Entrenchment of State Secrecy

33 Pages Posted: 27 Nov 2008 Last revised: 31 Aug 2017

See all articles by Alasdair S. Roberts

Alasdair S. Roberts

University of Massachusetts Amherst - School of Public Policy

Date Written: May 15, 2003

Abstract

In Central and Eastern Europe, the rapid diffusion of right-to-information laws has been matched by an equally quick spread of state secrets laws. CEE countries are adopting these laws to meet requirements for accession to NATO. NATO refuses to disclose its security of information (SOI) requirements, but the policy, crafted in the early years of the Cold War, appears to be very conservative. It is the foundation of a thickening web of intergovernmental SOI agreements. Such agreements impose significant constraints on the domestic transparency policies of many governments, and pose substantial challenges for advocates of increased transparency. Archival records show that many NATO members were concerned about the impact that NATO requirements would have on domestic policy. It is time for the debate over such SOI rules to be democratized. A first step would be public release of NATO's SOI requirements.

Keywords: transparency, freedom of information, right to information, government secrecy, NATO, national security, defense, defence

Suggested Citation

Roberts, Alasdair S., Entangling Alliances: Nato's Security Policy and the Entrenchment of State Secrecy (May 15, 2003). Cornell International Law Journal, Vol. 36, No. 2, 2003. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1307692

Alasdair S. Roberts (Contact Author)

University of Massachusetts Amherst - School of Public Policy ( email )

Thompson Hall
Amherst, MA 01003
United States
6175999029 (Phone)

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